Metabolism Research Resources

The site is organized as follows. First, a general overview of campus research centers and cores is provided. Second, a detailed list of campus research facilities organized into six general areas:

  • Animal or Plant housing facilities, services and research cores. Go to
  • Biochemical and Biophysical instrumentation facilities and services ranging characterization of various macromolecules (molecular weight, interactions, spectroscopic properties, calorimetry; and NMR for structural or metabolomic studies. Go to
  • Cell and Molecular facilities and services including light and electron microscopy/imaging facilities; DNA synthesis, flow cytometry; gene expression and molecular diagnostics; high throughput sequencing; histology; mass spectrometry for proteomics and metabolomics; small molecule screening facility and various genomic approaches; Go to
  • Clinical Research Services through the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR) or other sites that focus on many aspects of human studies including clinical trials; Go to
  • Computational and Statistical services for assistance with study design in animal or human studies and for analysis of large data sets in molecular, genomic or clinical trial studies; and Go to
  • Structural biology focused on the world class NMR facilities on campus. In the near future it will be possible to search for facilties/cores or equipment by method. Go to

Campus Research Centers and Cores

  • Analytical Instrumentation Center (AIC)

    Located in the School of Pharmacy, AIC comprises mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and spectrophotometry facilities, plus an electronics shop. The center supports the research enterprise across UW-Madison by providing advanced instrumentation and ancillary equipment, and expertise in its use and application. AIC staff can provide service, training and collaborative research assistance.

    Learn more >
  • Biochemistry Optical Core (BOC)

    BOC provides state-of-the-art instrumentation for light and fluorescence based microscopy, including epifluorescence, confocal, and super-resolution imaging. Located in the Biochemical Sciences building, BOC serves the campus research community by providing access to and training on basic and advanced light microscopy techniques.

    Learn more >
  • Biophysics Instrumentation Facility (BIF)

    BIF, located in the Biochemical Sciences building, provides access to top instrumentation focused on the study of conformations, activities and assembly of biological and other macromolecules. While each instrument provides distinct insight, the ensemble enables a thorough characterization of, structure, function and interaction of biological assemblies.

    Learn more >
  • Biotechnology Center

    This center is committed to maximizing the benefits of biotechnology research within UW-Madison, the UW System, Wisconsin and the nation. Research cores include bioinformatics, DNA sequencing and synthesis, gene expression, mass spectrometry and proteomics, genome editing, translational genomics and transgenic animals. The center also provides a range of workshops and seminars to the campus and the community.

    Learn more >
  • UW Carbone Cancer Center Research Services (CCC)

    This NIH-funded comprehensive cancer center focuses on clinical and basic science studies. For metabolism researchers, core facilities include experimental pathology, flow cytometry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenetics and proteomics. CCC also has centers for small animal imaging, small molecule screening and synthesis, transgenic animals and translational science.

    Learn more >
  • Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR)

    ICTR works to advance the full research continuum, from investigation through discovery and translation into real-life improvements in human health. Services for metabolism researchers that are ICTR members include biostatistics consultation, data analysis and interpretation; biomedical informatics for clinical data mining; clinical research services including a human clinical research units; and laboratories and centers focusing on therapeutic discovery and development. ICTR also has a pilot project grants program, numerous classes including some on grant writing (K award, transition to independence grants),and a master’s program in clinical research.

    Learn more >
  • National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRF)

    NMRF is a shared instrumentation laboratory located at the Department of Biochemistry. With the use of NMR and small angle X-Ray scattering (SAXS) approaches, the facility offers services on protein and RNA structural analysis; determination of the structure, dynamics, and functional properties of challenging proteins; and nucleic acids and their complexes. The center also provides NMR-based studies of metabolomics and natural products.

    Learn more >
  • Paul Bender Chemical Instrumentation Center

    The center is home to the Chemistry Department's major shared analytical instrumentation, including magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. These instruments are maintained and updated by an expert staff that provides user training and data interpretation in support of chemistry research. The center, located in the Chemistry building, is open to campus community researchers.

    Learn more >
  • Translational Research Initiatives in Pathology (TRIP) Lab

    TRIP offers histological, molecular/morphometric analyses and consultative services such as tissue arrays, laser dissection microscopy and quantitative morphometric analyses via imaging, and immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization on a fee-for-service basis. This facility supports pathology faculty and trainees working on translational and collaborative research projects. TRIP partners with Carbone Cancer Center Biobank as part of their Translational Science Biocore (TSB) and is available to campus and community scientists.

    Learn more >
  • Wisconsin National Primate Research Center (WNPRC)

    The WNPRC strives to understand basic primate biology and to improve human health and quality of life through research. The center helps discover treatments, preventions and cures for human disease; generates new knowledge of primate biology; facilitates research progress by providing expertise, resources and training to scientists worldwide; and provides primate information to the research community and the public. The primate center houses a number of core facilities to support research in non-human primates as well metabolic research in other species. See the “Animal or Plant Housing and Research Facilities” section.

    Learn more >
  • Resource Animal Resource Center (RARC)

    The RARC provides veterinary, laboratory, and training services in support of quality animal care; oversight and assistance to assure compliance with all laws, regulations, and rules governing the care and use of laboratory animals; and research and consultation on animal models for biomedical research.

    Learn more >
  • Waisman Center

    Waisman focuses on research on intellectual and developmental disabilities and facilitates the advancement and integration of behavioral and biological research through four scientific cores. Those include clinical translational, brain imaging, rodent models, and cellular and molecular neuroscience. It also offers services for manufacturing and testing of biological pharmaceuticals for clinical trials.

    Learn more >

Campus Research Resources (By Methodology)

Animal or Plant Housing and Research Facilities

The UW campus maintains facilities for housing of animals and plants under a range of defined growth conditions. In addition, several facilities are available on campus for assisting researchers with procedures that require specialized expertise or for which the requisite equipment is only present in a facility larger than an individual laboratory. Contact each of the facilities below for more information.

  • Biotron

    The Biotron is a controlled testing environment spanning both animal and plant research programs. The animal facility offers AAALAC-accredited facilities with professional animal care for Level 1 specific pathogen-free mouse housing, individual housing rooms for other rodents and exotics, and controlled environments for approved departures from standard conditions. The plant facility provides controlled environments and research-grade greenhouse rooms to simulate a wide range of the world's natural climates and biomes.

    Learn more >
  • Botany Plant Growth Facilities

    These Department of Botany facilities include eight greenhouses encompassing 8,000 square feet bounded by Chamberlain, Lathrop and Birge Halls. The facility features more than 1,000 species and aquatic, desert and tropical communities. Researchers undertake a variety of projects in plant geography, physiology, anatomy, ecology, taxonomy and other related areas.

    Learn more >
  • Cardiovascular Physiology Core Facility

    This facility provides UW-Madison and community researchers with a central resource for creating and studying cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology in animal models on a fee-for-service basis. The facility is conducting studies focusing on diabetes, drug toxicology, heart failure, arrhythmias, gene, drug and cell therapy and other cardiovascular diseases.

    Learn more >
  • Large Animal Facilities

    The Departments of Animal Sciences and Dairy Sciences and the USDA Dairy Forage Research Center manage several facilities for metabolic experiments in large animals including poultry, cattle and swine.

    Learn more >
  • Dairy Cattle Research Centers

    The Dairy Science department has a research dairy facility both on campus and at the Emmons Blaine facility in Arlington. This on campus facility allows individual housing and thus easy access to cows for intensive measurements. Cows are readily moved between this facility and the Arlington facility (approximately 20 miles North of campus) for experimental purposes.

  • Dairy Forage Research Center

    The primary research farm for the Center is located in Prairie du Sac, WI. All feed, milk, manure and soil samples will prepared and can be quantitatively analyzed at the Center. The farm facility also includes a new state-of-the-art set of 4 emission chambers each of which houses 3 cows. The emission chambers are climate controlled and can be managed to collect all animal manure and urine as well as measure all respiration and emissions. Feed and water intake data can also be collected on each cow in the chambers. A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) multi-gas monitor (Gasmet DX4015) coupled with a multiplex air sampler is used to measure CH4, CO2, N2O, NH3 and other gasses emitted from the chambers.

  • Emmons Blaine Dairy Research Facility

    This facility in Arlington, WI houses cattle in sand-bedded freestalls. There are 16 pens that can house up to 8 cows per pen and a free-stall facility that has 32 automated individual feeders (Insentec RIC feeders). Radio Frequency IDs can be to control and measure feed intake in a free stall barn setting. Each cow has her visit to a feeder recorded and intakes at each visit are automatically downloaded to a daily spreadsheet log.

    Learn more >
  • UW Swine Research & Teaching Center (SRTC)

    The facility is available for collaborative research using swine as a model system and for educational activities. Education will provide information and an opportunity to learn through first-hand experience. The SRTC is an AAALAC accredited facility that houses a large breeding herd, with a total capacity of over 1,500 pigs. The center includes four animal housing wings, an education wing and a core support area with surgery and lab space.

    Learn more >
  • Translational Research Facility (“Livestock Laboratory”).

    The facility is designed to support intensive biomedical research involving the use of large animal models (e.g. swine and sheep). The facility has a complete surgical suite with surgical staff prep, and animal prep, surgery and recovery rooms. The surgical suite also has the capabilities for performing x-ray fluoroscopy guided cardiac catheterizations and angiography. The facility houses a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) imaging system for bone densitometry and body composition studies. Dedicated animal rooms capable of small-scale breeding enable prenatal and neonatal studies. Limited capabilities for BSL 2 experiments involving large animal models are also available.

    Learn more >
  • Pharmacokinetics and Dynamics

    The Carbone Cancer Center Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacogenetics (3P Lab) advances cancer research by providing expertise on bioanalytical assay development, validation and performance in support of the research endeavors of cancer investigators. Services include sample acquisition, analytical assays for pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenic assays and pre-clinical analytics services.

    Learn more >
  • Poultry Research Laboratory

    The animal rooms provide various means of rearing poultry in confinement. This facility is used for nutritional, toxicological and other types of research with a variety of poultry species. The facility has extensive experience with antibody production in chickens where large quantifies can be rapidly obtained from eggs. The facility can accommodate studies with poultry from chicks through adults.

    Learn more >
  • Research Animal Resource Center (RARC)

    RARC provides services through its Comparative Pathology Laboratory for animal studies including necropsy, hematology, parasitology, clinical chemistry testing and histology, assistance with mouse breeding and ordering pharmaceuticals for animal studies. RARC also offers courses on humane and safe use of animals in research. The Clinical Pathology service is dedicated to the study of comparative pathology in a wide variety of species as well as investigation of animal models of human disease. The laboratory can provide diagnostic services labs on the UW campus.

    Learn more >
  • Small Animal Imaging Facility (SAIF)

    SAIF provides affordable, noninvasive, high-resolution, in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging support to researchers from on- and off-campus that use small animal models in their research. The facility contains instruments for anatomic imaging using microCT scanning (for mice and rats); microPET and microPET/CT scanning for disease detection; optical scanning (e.g. bioluminescence, fluorescence) including multiple fluorescent reporters in a single animal; intraoperative real time NIR scanning; and high-resolution MRI scanning with a range of isotopes and procedures including the ability for rapid in-vivo investigation of biochemical events enhanced with carbon-13 labeled substrates. Diet, temperature and other experimental variables can be modulated in many of these approaches.

    Learn more >
  • UW Biotechnology Center - Transgenic and Mutant Animal Facility and Genome Editing Facility

    This facility offers genome editing and animal model services and provides expert advice from experimental design to production of genetically engineered models. Services include design consultation for gene targeting and editing constructs; reagent preparation; transgenic mouse or rat production; and embryo microinjection. The core provides assistance with design of CRISPR/Cas9 protocols for gene editing; cryopreservation of embryos and sperm, rederivation of strains and in vitro fertilization.

    Learn more >
  • Waisman Center – Animal In Vivo Imaging

    The Center for Brain Imaging and Behavior has extensive MRI and PET instruments for a range of animal studies in primates or rodents. This imaging lab houses a GE MR750 3T scanner for structural and functional brain imaging; a Siemens EXACT HR+ scanner for human PET studies; a Concorde Microsystems microPET-P4 system for non-human primate PET studies; a NEC tandem van de Graaff ion beam accelerator and radiochemistry labs for the production of PET radiotracers. It also provides an MRI simulator room, an MRI preparation room for pre- and post-scan behavioral measures; image processing areas with extensive computing facilities; and an experimental suite for combined behavioral and psychophysiological recordings.

    Learn more >
  • Waisman Center – Behavioral Testing in Rodents

    This service provides support for the behavioral phenotyping of mouse and rat models of neurodevelopmental disorders. The service provides for research collaborations that share the mission of the Waisman Center.

    Learn more >
  • Walnut Street Greenhouses

    This CALS complex consists of a greenhouse facility with three growth chambers and two walk-in coolers, along with additional outdoor cold-frame space. The greenhouse has 72 individual houses of varying size, providing 14,600 square feet of bench space under glass. More than 50 coldframes provide about 4000 square feet of additional research space.

    Learn more >
  • Wisconsin National Primate Research Center (WNPRC)

    One of only seven NIH-sponsored National Primate Research Centers, the WNPRC maintains breeding colonies of rhesus and marmoset monkeys and acquires macaques as needed for specific studies. Comprehensive veterinary services are available enable a wide range of research projects. The WNPRC also has a variety of service core laboratories for researchers working on non-human and human primates: including assays of endocrine and other biomarkers; determination MHC genotype and SIV genotyping/sequencing; immunology and viral services cores; and a metabolism core that offers expertise and technology for measurement energy balance and substrate metabolism. The WNPRC also maintains repositories of fixed and frozen tissues and hosts the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Aged Primate Tissue Bank and Primate Aging Database.

    Learn more >

Biochemical / Biophysical Facilities and Instrumentation

The UW campus contains a large range of equipment and service facilities for performing various types of spectroscopy (UV-VIS, Fluorescence, Infrared), determination of the mass, interactions and other physical properties of various macromolecules/polymers, metabolomics, nucleic acid quantification by PCR and other methods, transcriptome as well as genome-wide association (GWAS) analysis by microarray or next generation sequencing methods; NMR instruments for structural as well as metabolomic studies.

  • Analytical Instrumentation Center (AIC) of the School of Pharmacy

    Located in the UW-Madison School of Pharmacy, AIC comprises mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and spectrophotometry facilities, plus an electronics shop. The center supports the research enterprise across UW-Madison by providing advanced instrumentation and ancillary equipment, and expertise in its use and application.

    Learn more >
  • Biophysics Instrumentation Facility (BIF)

    BIF, housed in the Department of Biochemistry, provides access to instrumentation focused on the study of conformations, activities and assembly of biological and other macromolecules. This facility is available to all researchers and the public to allow access to instrumentation that might not otherwise be available on tight research budgets. Instrumentation includes an analytical ultracentrifuge for solution characterization of macromolecules, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for kinetic and affinity studies of macromolecules; spectroscopic instruments including high sensitivity UV-visible, circular dichroism (CD), high sensitivity fluorometer, and direct detect infra-red instruments; dynamic and multi-angle laser light scattering instruments; thermodynamic instrumentation for differential scanning and isothermal titration calorimeters.

    Learn more >
  • Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) - Metabolomics

    BMRB collects, archives and disseminates worldwide the important data derived from NMR spectroscopic investigations of biological macromolecules. BMRB provides bioinformatic services for structural determination of macromolecules as well as for quantification of metabolites in complex biological samples.

    Learn more >
  • National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM)

    This NIH-NIGMS funded facility houses 10 NMR spectrometers operating between 400 MHz and 900 MHz. The 9 higher-field spectrometers are equipped with cryogenic probes, and three of these spectrometers have high-throughput sample changers. In addition, NMRFAM offers a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer system with solid phase extraction and a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) system. Technology at NMRFAM is driven by collaborative projects focused on three areas: (1) making biomolecular NMR studies more accessible to biologists by automating steps and reducing costs; (2) pushing the limits of the technology for large proteins and RNA molecules and their complexes including membrane proteins; and (3) NMR investigations of small biomolecules: metabolomics, ligand screening, and structures of natural products. NMRFAM is active in the development and maintenance of user-friendly software tools that facilitate data collection, data processing, and analysis. NMRFAM is supported by NIH Grant P41GM103399.

    Learn more >
  • Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery/Morgridge Shared Research Equipment –Biochemical/Biophysical

    Researchers and community members can test the latest in scientific equipment on loan to Discovery teaching labs from various companies. Discovery Outreach provides access to the newest and most advanced equipment in an effort to ensure that technology complements the work of UW-Madison researchers and private industry partners. Current instrumentation includes a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer; a double beam spectrometer with rapid mixing capability for kinetic measurements; NanoDrop spectrometer and a NanoDrop fluorometer.

    Learn more >

Cell and Molecular Biology

The techniques covered in this section include: a) Cell Imaging – Light Microscopy; b) Cell Imaging- Electron Microscopy; c) DNA Sequencing; d) DNA Synthesis; e) Flow Cytometry; f) Histology; g) Mass Spectrometry; h) Molecular Diagnostics and Gene Expression Profiling including next-generation sequencing for genomic and transcriptomic analyses; and i) PCR. For animal imaging services see the Animal and Plant Housing section.

Cell Imaging – Light Microscopy

  • Biochemistry Optical Core

    The core provides modern instrumentation for super-resolution light microscopic imaging. Imaging techniques include standard fluorescence; super-resolution microscopy; live-cell long-term imaging; point scanning confocal; deconvolution; 3D particle tracking; fluorescence spectral detection; TIRF; FRET; FRAP/FLIP; photoactivation/uncaging; calcium imaging; and single molecule imaging. Instrumentation in the core includes Nikon multiphoton confocal microscope, a Nikon structure illumination microscope and a Nikon STORM/TIRF epifluorescence microsope.

    Learn more >
  • Keck Laboratory for Biological Imaging

    This lab provides confocal and multiphoton imaging services to any UW-Madison scientist. The lab offers imaging services on three laser scanning fluorescent microscopes, a Nikon A1R high-speed confocal microscope, a Bio-Rad Radiance 2100 MP Rainbow confocal/multiphoton microscope, and a Bio-Rad MRC-1024 confocal microscope.

    Learn more >
  • Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation (LOCI)

    LOCI is a biophotonics instrumentation laboratory stemming from the research activities of UW-Madison imaging scientists. Its mission is to develop advanced optical and computational techniques for imaging and experimentally manipulating living specimens. To benefit the scientific community, LOCI develops new and improved imaging instrumentation and optical-based experimental techniques. LOCI has a wide array of instrumentation and computational techniques facilitating research of interest to metabolism investigators including: mapping the cellular distribution of metabolites such as NADH; multiphoton flow cytometry allows for analysis of the location and spatial distribution of fluorescent markers in multicellular aggregrates such as embryoid bodies.

    Learn more >
  • Carbone Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Facility – Fluorescence Microscope

    The Olympus BX51 Fluorescent Microscope is capable of bright field, dark field and fluorescent microscopy. The microscope, available for self-run appointment only, is attached to a CCD camera and PC for taking pictures.

    Learn more >
  • Waisman Center Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience – Microscopy

    The facility provides experimental design consultation and training on fluorescence quantitation and image analysis (Confocal and fluorescence/brightfield imaging, Stereology). Equipment includes the Leica TCS-LSI Macroconfocal stereomicroscope, which allows seamless magnification change from overview to detail with free 3D navigation through the sample – from embryo to subcellular. The high confocal resolution and large field of view allows unique in vivo imaging of large samples. In addition, a Perkin Elmer High Content Operetta Imaging System allows for performing assay development, genome-wide siRNA, compound screens or looking at a few samples in great detail and is applicable to a wide array of cell systems.

    Learn more >
  • Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery/Morgridge Shared Research Equipment – Microscopy

    Located in the Discovery Building, this resource offers opportunities for researchers, the public and industry to test new scientific tools firsthand. In addition to microscopy, a range of cutting-edge molecular spectroscopy equipment is available for use by the community. Training time and initial usage is free of charge, after which a fee structure applies. Instrumentation include: DXR Raman microscope that can be used for to identify unknowns, solve chemical composition questions or characterize structural changes in sample; and a Zeiss fluorescence stereo zoom microscope offers superior brightness in large fields allowing analysis of single cells or in model organisms such as C. elegans.

    Learn more >

Cell Imaging - Electron Microscopy

  • Biological & Biomaterials Preparation, Imaging, and Characterization Laboratory (BBPIC)

    The BBPIC does service work and training in microscopy and preparation methods for members of the UW-Madison campus, and for off-campus and industry clients. It assists clients in sectioning; embedding and fixation for TEM and SEM; staining (biological TEM samples) and cryo-techniques. The lab also can aid in the production of slush nitrogen for ultra-rapid refreezing of samples.

    Learn more >
  • Medical School Electron Microscope Facility

    This facility is committed to providing up-to-date electron microscopy services to the UW System. The facility is open for use to the university research community and the private sector (at an additional cost). Staff will work with any organization needing electron microscopy applications, consultation, and/or training.

    Learn more >
  • Newcomb Imaging Center

    This Plant Imaging Center in the Department of Botany offers expertise, instruction, and instrumentation in modern microscopy to the UW-Madison plant research community. Current research covers many plant biology topics, including calcium signaling, tropism responses, mechanical signaling, embryo development, leaf development, hormone signaling, pollen phenotyping, protein degradation, and membrane dynamics.

    Learn more >
  • Translational Research Initiatives in Pathology (TRIP) Lab

    TRIP offers histological, molecular/morphometric analyses and consultative services such as tissue arrays, laser dissection microscopy, quantitative morphometric analyses via imaging, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to campus users and beyond on a fee-for-service basis. This facility provides support to pathology faculty and trainees working on translational and collaborative research projects. TRIP partners with UW Carbone Cancer Center’s Biobank as part of their Translational Science BioCore.

    Learn more >
  • Vision Research Core

    This lab uses the Andor Revolution XD microscopy system (with high speed spinning disk confocal, TIRF and Mosaic abilities) to study intracellular organelle trafficking and follow endo- and exocytic events at the cell membrane in real time. This is a shared instrumentation facility supported by the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, the School of Medicine and Public Health and by grants from the Research to Prevent Blindness Foundation and Reeves Foundation for Macular Degeneration Research.

    Learn more >

DNA Sequencing

  • UW Biotechnology Center - DNA Sequencing Facility

    The facility provides comprehensive, fee-for-service support for both Illumina Next Generation and Sanger sequencing projects, from project design and sample preparation through downstream analysis in conjunction with the Biotech Center Bioinformatics Resource Facility. It also provides DNA extraction, SNP genotyping, and fragment analysis services, and can facilitate custom projects upon request.

    Learn more >

DNA Synthesis

Flow Cytometry

Histology

  • Carbone Cancer Center Experimental Pathology Laboratory

    This lab provides histology services to UW Carbone Cancer Center members, the campus community and off-campus researchers. Services include preparation of histologic sections from both paraffin-embedded and frozen tissue, including serial sections; block preparations of cell pellets and embryoid bodies; routine and specialized histotechnology methods (H&E, enzyme histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, special stains); and slide preparation for in situ hybridization, laser capture microscopy, and audioradiography.

    Learn more >
  • Research Animal Resource Center Comparative Pathology Laboratory

    This service is dedicated to the study of comparative pathology in a wide variety of species as well as investigation of animal models of human disease. Histology services cover the processing of specimens in alcohol or formalin, the cutting of paraffin blocks and slide preparation and the use of a wide array of staining protocols. Consultations with histotechnologist and pathologist are available and training in some of the offered techniques is available. The laboratory welcomes collaborations with investigators using all species of animals.

    Learn more >
  • Translational Research Initiatives in Pathology (TRIP) - Histology

    TRIP provides histology services ranging from specimen collection to embedding to special stains; immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization for new or established antigens; and normal or benign formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded control tissues.

    Learn more >

Mass Spectrometry

  • UW-Madison Biotechnology Center – Mass Spectrometry, Proteomics and Metabolomics Facility

    This facility houses several mass spectrometers for the analysis of biomolecules, including proteins, peptides, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides and other small organic and inorganic molecules. Instruments include an ESI-MS equipped with HPLC systems which are used with reversed phase nanobore / capillary columns, for LC/MS/MS experiments. An LC-MALDI spotter is available for combining separations with MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Proteolytic digestions of proteins, which can be further analyzed by HPLC, MS, LC/MS and MS/MS for peptide mapping and peptide sequencing can also be performed.

    Learn more >
  • Laboratory for Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry

    This new campus mass spectrometry resource employs targeted and discovery mass spectrometry approaches for large-scale identification and quantification of metabolites. Housed within the Genetics-Biotechnology Center, the center is equipped with a Thermo Scientific Q Exactive Focus Orbitrap LC-MS with Ultimate 3000 LC; Thermo Scientific TSQ Quantiva QQQ LC-MS with Ultimate 3000 LC; Thermo Scientific ISQ LT single quad GC-MS with Trace 1310 GC and AI 1310 autosampler; Thermo Scientific Q Exactive Orbitrap GC-MS with Trace 1310 GC and TriPlus RSH autosampler; Thermo Scientific Q Exactive Orbitrap LC-MS with Accela 1250 LC; and an Agilent Technologies 6460 QQQ LC-MS with 1200 series LC. The facility is supported by the Morgridge Institute of Research, the Departments of Biomolecular Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center. Prof. Joshua Coon is Director and Jason Russell PhD is Associate Director. More information about the services provided by the Laboratory for Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry will be forthcoming.

  • Paul Bender Chemical Instrumentation Center – Mass Spectrometry Facility

    The mass spectrometry laboratory specializes in supporting chemical synthesis taking place in the Chemistry Department and elsewhere on campus. Currently seven instruments are being used to carry out that mission. The instruments range in capability from single quadrupole GCMS to MALDI-TOF to ESI-Q-TOF to ESI-Q-orbitrap. The four main ionization methods available are EI, ASAP-MS™, MALDI, and ESI. The facility generates mass spectra for researchers and also trains interested graduate students and postdocs to acquire their own mass spectra. Contact Dr. Martha Vestling (vestling@wisc.edu) with questions.

    Learn more >
  • School of Medicine and Public Health Human Proteomics Program

    Core facilities of the Human Proteomics Program are dedicated to understanding disease and discovery of biomarkers associated with human disease.

    Learn more >
  • School of Pharmacy Mass Spectrometry Facility

    Instrumentation include an Agilent 1100 LC-MSD VL quadropole that offers multi-stage MS sensitivity, scan speed and resolution and is capable of ionizing a broad range of compounds. The instrument configuration allows rapid analysis of reaction products and is available 24 hr a day if the user has completed the training course. Additional instrumentation includes an Agilent 1100 LC-MSD quadrupole SL instrument is available for quantitation of drugs and drug metabolites in plasma, serum extracts or other bio-fluids; an Agilent 1100 MSD Trap SL and an IonSpec ProMALDI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer for structural analyses and parent mass measurements.

    Learn more >

Molecular Diagnostics and Gene Expression Profiling

  • Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation (MCRF) Core Laboratory

    The lab has expertise in microbiology, virology, cell culture, molecular biology, DNA sequencing, genotyping, and can assist with new assay development for specific research applications. The lab also has high containment (BSL3) facilities and provides biological specimen banking services for the 20,000 individual Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    Learn more >
  • Translational Research Initiatives in Pathology (TRIP) Lab – Molecular Diagnostics

    The lab offers molecular/morphometric analyses and consultative services such as tissue arrays and laser dissection microscopy. It provides DNA and RNA isolation from fresh, frozen tissue, formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue, and from micro-dissected tissue specimens obtained using laser capture microscopy. A tissue culture cell line authentification service and custom assay development are also available.

    Learn more >
  • Small Molecule Screening and Synthesis Facility (SMSSF)

    The facility fosters collaborative drug discovery research between chemists, biologists and physician scientists to identify new small molecules that inhibit disease targets and phenotypes in biochemical and cellular models relevant to any therapeutic area.

    Learn more >
  • UW-Biotechnology Center - Gene Expression Center

    The center provides global gene expression (transcriptome) analysis and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) services using next generation sequencing and microarray technologies. Proteomic and metabolomic services are also available. Core services include microarray/gene chip; transcriptomic and genomic services; qPCR; protein and nucleic acid quantification and size analysis; targeted and untargeted metabolomics; and proteomics services. A variety of instrumentation is available for independent access, and training is available in some cores.

    Learn more >

Clinical Research Services

The majority of clinical research services are coordinated largely through the UW Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR). Services include the Clinical Research Unit in UW Hospital and Clinics (UWHC), the Office of Clinical Trials, Marshfield’s clinical research center, the Wisconsin Network for Health Research, the Wisconsin Education and Research Network, and the UWHC Pharmaceutical Research Center.

Facilities Run or Supported by the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR)

  • Clinical Research Toolkit

    This toolkit provides guidance, applications, templates and helpful website links for clinical research staff to use at various time points throughout the life cycle of a study.

    Learn more >
  • Clinical Research Unit (CRU)

    The CRU, open 24/7, has 15 registered nurses to serve inpatient and outpatient research in space in UW Hospital and Clinics. The CRU has more than 25 years of experience, and welcomes both investigator-initiated and industry studies.

    Learn more >
  • Imaging Core Facilities

    These labs offer special protocol review services and discounted imaging rates to ICTR members. Instrumentation for MRI, PET and CT scanning is available and can be used in human and/or animal studies. Currently, research time is available on several imaging modalities within the UW Hospital and Clinics and the Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research (WIMR).

    Learn more >
  • Office of Clinical Trials (OCT)

    OCT provides financial consultations, budget negotiation and management. OCT also offers experienced research coordination and IRB application support, with variable purchase options for those services.

    Learn more >
  • Research Software Tools

    These research software tools include OnCore (clinical research management), OnCore BSM (biospecimen management), REDCap, and ARROW, the online protocol submission and tracking program for the Health Sciences Institutional Review Boards.

    Learn more >
  • Study Monitoring Service

    This service offers investigators independent compliance reviews, including ongoing study monitoring, pre-FDA or NIH audit preparation, and one-time quality assurance reviews. It also conducts compliance reviews on behalf of the institution, including UW Health leadership, Institutional Review Boards, Office of Research Policy, and other organizational officials.

    Learn more >
  • The Clinical Research Center at Marshfield Clinic

    Providing centralized research support for clinician-led research, the Marshfield Clinic staff of clinical research coordinators, regulatory specialists, and contract/finance personnel support approximately 150 clinician investigators and maintain 400 active clinical trials.

    Learn more >
  • The Wisconsin Research & Education Network (WREN)

    WREN is a statewide primary care, practice-based research network. Researchers may collaborate with WREN when their research involves partnerships with multi-site primary care clinicians, practices, and the communities they serve; quality improvement and enhancement; and underserved populations.

    Learn more >
  • UW Hospital Pharmaceutical Research Center (PRC)

    The PRC reviews study feasibility, prepares budget estimates, and manages clinical research drug distribution. All clinical drug research protocols within UW Hospital and Clinics must be coordinated through the PRC.

    Learn more >
  • Wisconsin Network for Health Research (WiNHR)

    WiNHR offers investigators the opportunity to do research across Wisconsin through its member groups that include the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Aurora Health Care in Milwaukee, and Gundersen Lutheran Medical Foundation in La Crosse.

    Learn more >

Other Facilities

  • Department of Radiology Research and Imaging Facility

    The Radiology Department has active research programs and fee for service facilities focused on the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning for a variety of metabolic and other functional studies of organ physiology, function and structure.

    Learn more >
  • UW-Biotechnology Center Isotope Ratio Laboratory

    The Isotope Ratio Lab performs high precision, differential stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) on hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon and oxygen. Analyses are performed on bulk samples of water, nitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide and dry solids via combustion. Samples can range from natural abundance to biologic tracers studies with enrichments up to twice natural abundance The lab’s expertise in energy balance leads the main operation of the facility. They specialize in the doubly labeled water technique to measure body composition and energy expenditure in humans. The facility can also measure respiratory gas exchange via metabolic cart and whole room calorimetry (with total urinary nitrogen option available) in humans. Additionally, solid samples can be assessed via bomb calorimetry. Recording pedometers are available for loan with optional consulting and data analysis packages..

    Learn more >
  • Waisman Center Brain Imaging Core – Human Scanning

    The PET scanning facilities consist of a Siemens ECAT EXACT HR+ PET scanner and its adjacent control room, subject prep room, and blood metabolite analysis lab. A dedicated particle accelerator and radiochemistry lab support the imaging experiments. The PET scanner room is also equipped with a positional computer monitor for performing computer tasks during the acquisition of the scans. The Waisman Center and UW Medical Physics have a radiochemistry facility for production of various short-lived and safe nuclides used in chemical synthesis of metabolic tracers for PET studies.

    Learn more >

Bioinformatic, Computational, Statistical Consulting

Services available in the following facilities range from study design for animal or human studies, statistical analysis of small or large data sets including clinical trial data or results for genomic, proteomic or transcriptomic experiments. In addition, an extensive resource for spectral and quantitative data for NMR studies for a wide array of metabolites as well as various biological macromolecules.

  • Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB)

    BMRB collects, archives, and disseminates worldwide the important quantitative data derived from NMR spectroscopic investigations of biological macromolecules. BMRB provides bioinformatic services for structural determination of macromolecules as well as for quantification of metabolites in complex biological samples. BMRB offers one of the most complete repositories of NMR spectral data from metabolites and other small molecules. Raw (time-domain) spectral data are available as well as one- and two-dimensional spectra and peak lists. The database can be queried in various ways (compound name, mass, structure, chemical shift).

    Learn more >
  • Center for High Throughput Computing

    The center serves as the campus's centralized research computing center, with free access provided to UW-Madison affiliates and direct collaborators. CHTC maintains multiple computing clusters, perfect for research needs that expand beyond a typical desktop or laptop, and CHTC's Research Computing Facilitators (RCFs) meet with all new users to help them get started as smoothly as possible. Individual users of CHTC have obtained up to 200,000 CPU hours (~20 years) of computing in a single day. RCFs can also work with researchers to arrange grant proposal text and/or letters of collaboration. UW-Madison affiliates interested in using CHTC should complete an initial Request Form in order to meet with an RCF and get accounts. General questions can be sent to chtc@cs.wisc.edu

    Learn more >
  • UW Biotechnology Center - Bioinformatics Resource Center (BRC)

    This facility provides bioinformatics support for high-throughput nucleic acid sequence data. Staff members help researchers with a variety of projects, including genome assembly, SNP detection, ChIP-Seq and expression profiling using RNA-Seq, RIP-seq, and small RNA analyses. They provide computational support to analyze data produced by next-generation sequencers at the Biotech Center’s DNA Sequencing Facility. Project-specific advanced bioinformatic analysis for researchers with high throughput sequence data can be provided.

    Learn more >
  • CALS Statistical Consulting Services

    This CALS consulting group provides UW-Madison faculty, staff, and students with assistance in the statistical aspects of research. Services include project development, grant writing, experimental design, data analyses, software use (including SAS and R), interpretation of results, writing of reports, manuscripts and presentations, and addressing reviewer comments.

    Learn more >

Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR)

  • Biostatistics and Research Design Resource (BARD)

    BARD provides biostatistical support and collaboration during the design, conduct, and analysis phases of clinical and translational research projects. BARD statisticians are involved in research planning and experimental design, proposal development, data analysis, interpretation, and presentation of results. Center staff have expertise in clinical trials, epidemiology, health services analysis, longitudinal and clustered data, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, retrospective studies, statistical genetics and genomics, spatial statistics and statistical model building, survival analysis and survey design and analysis.

    Learn more >
  • Biomedical Informatics (BMI) Core

    This core provides ICTR investigators with informatics support in the field of bioinformatics and clinical/health research. BMI personnel provide secure and efficient IT solutions, implementing existing technologies when available, and developing novel solutions as needed. Assistance is offered during project development, grant submission, and deployment of secure data storage and processing methods.

    Learn more >

Structural Biology

The UW campus has world class NMR facilities for structural analysis, dynamic functional properties of small to moderate sized proteins and RNAs. NMR based studies of metabolomics is also available.

  • National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRF)

    NMRF is a public resource for biomolecular NMR spectroscopy, housing 10 NMR spectrometers operating between 400 MHz and 900 MHz. The nine higher-field spectrometers are equipped with cryogenic probes, and three of these have high-throughput sample changers. In addition, NMRFAM offers a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer system with solid phase extraction and a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) system. Technology at NMRFAM is driven by collaborative projects focused on three areas: (1) making biomolecular NMR studies more accessible to biologists by automating steps and reducing costs; (2) pushing the limits of the technology for large proteins and RNA molecules and their complexes including membrane proteins; and (3) NMR investigations of small biomolecules: metabolomics, ligand screening, and structures of natural products.

    Learn more >
  • Paul Bender Chemical Instrumentation Center - Magnetic Resonance Facility:

    This facility has seven NMR (300-600MHz) and one ESR (X-band with Super-Hi Q cavity) spectrometers located in the Chemistry Building. Service work and/or training with direct access to spectrometers are available to UW and external users. The center has state-of-the-art high throughput capabilities for 1H, 13C, 19F and 31P, as well as for broadband (all other NMR-active) nuclei and variable temperature capabilities. Two spectrometers are equipped with customized instrumentation for performing high-pressure chemistry, and laser-assisted chemistry. Facility staff provides various levels of training. Detailed User Guides are available to assist in the use of all our instrumentation.

    Learn more >
  • Paul Bender Chemical Instrumentation Center – X-ray Crystallography Facility:

    The X-ray laboratory provides access to state-of-the-art single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction facilities to UW and external members of the scientific community. Professional crystallographic advice and services related to material crystallization and small-molecule structure solution and refinement are provided. The X-ray lab is ideally suited for structural studies of inorganic, organometallic, and organic materials. It has two single-crystal diffractometers with Mo and Cu radiation, each equipped with a variable temperature controller for characterizing samples in the 90-400 K temperature range. The center routinely handles stable as well as solvent-dependent and air-, moisture-, and light-sensitive crystals. High-resolution digital and optical microscopes outfitted with polarizers are used to examine crystals.

    Learn more >
  • School of Pharmacy NMR Spectroscopy Center

    The facility is equipped with a 400 and 500 MHz proton resonance frequency Varian INOVA model NMR spectrometers. Two (UI-400) or three (UI-500) transmitter channels; Z-axis pulsed-field gradient (PFG) drivers and probes enable gradient shimming and gradient- enhanced experiments; Digital Signal Processing (DSP) is available; Temperature controller module with a graphical user interface; FTS Systems VT air precooler obviates the need for a refillable heat-exchange dewar at temperatures greater than –40 C

    Learn more >