Metabolism Related Courses

Anatomy

  • Zoology 430: Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates

    Fall, 5 cr. Basic vertebrate anatomical systems and a consideration of variations, using functional embryological and evolutionary approaches. Lab dissection and study of representative vertebrate material. Two evening practical exams. Pre-Reqs: Intro course in zoology and sophomore standing

Biochemistry

  • Biochemistry 501: Introduction To Biochemistry

    Fall, Spring, 3 cr. Chemistry, nutrition, and metabolism of biological systems. Not accepted toward departmental major for M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 341 or 343. Available in-class or online.

  • Biochemistry 507: General Biochemistry 1

    Fall, 3 cr. Chemistry of biological materials, intermediary metabolism, and protein structure. Firstandingsemester of a year-long course in Biochemistry; Biochemistry 508 is offered in the spring. Designed and recommended for undergraduate Biochemistry majors, but others are welcome. Prereq: Chemistry 345. Honors credits available with consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 508: General Biochemistry 2

    Spring, 3 cr. Biosynthesis of biological molecules, signal transduction mechanisms, chemistry and metabolism of nucleic acids, protein synthesis, and molecular and cellular biology. Prerequisite: A grade of BC or higher in Biochemistry 507, or consent of the instructor. Honors credits available with consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 510: Biochemical Principles Of Human And Animal Nutrition (Also Nutri Sci 510)

    Fall, Spring, 3 cr. Emphasis on biochemical and physiological fundamentals of nutrition. Focuses on protein, fat, carbohydrate, energy, minerals, and vitamins and their roles and interrelationships in nutrition and metabolism. Prereqs: Biomolecular Chemistry 314 or 504; Biochemistry 501 or 507; or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 550: Topics In Medical Biochemistry

    Spring, 2 cr. Biochemical and molecular analyses of selected human diseases. Topics include lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, cell cycle regulation and oncogene function in cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) structure, life cycle, and mechanism of acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome (AIDS). Prereqs: Biochemistry 501, 507, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 601: Protein And Enzyme Structure And Function

    Fall, 2 cr. Protein structure and dynamics. Protein folding. Physical organic chemistry of enzymatic catalysis. Analysis of enzyme kinetics and receptor-ligand interactions. Enzymatic reaction mechanisms. Prereqs: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, 1 semester of physical chemistry, 1 year of organic chemistry, and consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 619: Advanced Nutrition: Intermediary Metabolism Of Macronutrients (Also Nutri Sci 619)

    Spring, 3 cr. Focus is on metabolic control; gastrointestinal physiology; nutrient absorption; molecular, cellular, organismal aspects of glucose transport, metabolism, regulation; fuel sensing; molecular regulation of fatty acid, lipid metabolism; cellular, organismal aspects of protein metabolism; hormonal control of metabolism. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student; Nutritional Sciences 510 or Biochemistry 507 & 508 or Biomolecular Chemistry 503 (or con reg) or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemisty 621: Plant Biochemistry (Also Botany 621)

    Spring, odd years; 3 cr. Lectures. Biochemistry of photosynthesis, respiration, cell walls, and other metabolic and biosynthetic processes in plants. Prereqs: Biochemistry 501 or 507 or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 625: Coenzymes And Cofactors In Enzymology

    Spring, 2 cr. Course will emphasize the importance of coenzyme and cofactors of enzymes in biochemistry. All aspects of the biochemistry of coenzymes will be covered, including their biosynthesis as far as is known, the biochemical reactions they catalyze, their chemical and spectroscopic properties, and the mechanisms by which they facilitate biochemical reactions. Prereqs: Chemistry 343 and 345 or equivalent, and Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, and Chemistry 561 or 565 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).

  • Biochemistry 630: Cellular Signal Transduction Mechanisms

    Fall, 3 cr. Comprehensive coverage of human hormones, growth factors and other mediators; emphasis on hormone and growth factor action in cytoplasm and nucleus and biosynthesis. Prereqs: Introductory biochemistry (Biochemistry 501 or 507 & 508) and cell biology (Biocore 303 or Zoology 570 or Pathology 750) or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 704: Chemical Biology (also Chemistry 704)

    Fall, 2 cr. Structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates; application of organic chemistry to problems in cell biology, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Prereqs: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, 1 year of organic chemistry and consent of the instructor. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, 1 yr organic chemistry & consent of the instructor.

Bioinformatics /Computation / Modeling

  • Biochemistry 609: Mathematical Methods For Systems Biology (Also Math/BMI/BMC 609)

    Spring, even years; 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological systems. Mathematical techniques include dynamical systems and differential equations. Applications to biological pathways, including understanding of bistability within chemical reaction systems, are emphasized. Prereqs: Math 340 or 341; Math 415; or consent of the instructor.

  • Biomedical Engineering 556: Systems biology - Mammalian Signaling Networks

    Spring, 3 cr. Introduction to the experimental and mathematical modeling techniques used in systems biology through lectures and critical analyses of relevant publications with a primary focus on gene/protein networks and mammalian systems. Pre-reqs: Zoology 570 or Biomedical Engineering 510; and Math 319 or Math 320 or Math 340; or consent of the instructor

  • Biomedical Engineering 782: Modeling Biological Systems

    Spring, 3 cr. Literature survey of mathematical models in biology at the molecular and cellular levels; application of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics to biological systems; comparison of deterministic and stochastic strategies. Pre-Reqs: Math 319 or 320 or consent of the instructor.

  • Biomedical Engineering 783: Design of Biological Macromolecules

    Spring, 3 cr. Introduction to the methodologies for engineering the structure and function of biological molecules, especially proteins. Students will develop an understanding for the integration of computation and experiment to address biological molecular engineering problems. Pre-Reqs: Biocore 303 or Biochemistry 501 or Zoology 570; or consent of the instructor.

  • Botany 555: Plant Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics

    Fall, 2-3 cr. A survey of the underlying technologies of genomic research with a special emphasis on their applications in plant science. Provides students with a deeper understanding of the many public resources and databases being generated by large-scale genomics projects. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing; undergraduates with Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Botany 563: Phylogenetic Analysis of Molecular Data

    Spring, 3 cr. A course in the theory and practice of phylogenetic inference from DNA sequence data. Pre-Reqs: A course in genetics/evolution/systematics & a course in statistics/probability, or consent of the instructor.

  • Botany 629: Evolutionary Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Basic principles of phylogenetics, population genetics and quantitative genetics including the construction of gene trees, forces affecting the amount and distribution of genetic variation in populations, and the inheritance and evolution of multifactorial characters. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Biocore 301 & 302 or equivalent. Knowledge of introductory calculus & statistics or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 915: Computation and Informatics in Biology & Medicine (CIBM)

    Genetics 915: Computation and Informatics in Biology & Medicine (CIBM)
    Spring, 1 cr. Participants and outside speakers will discuss current research in computation and informatics in biology and medicine. This seminar is required of all CIBM program trainees. Pre-req: Consent of the instructor.

  • Horticulture 555: Plant Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics

    Fall, 2-3 cr. A survey of the underlying technologies of genomic research with a special emphasis on their applications in plant science. Provides students with a deeper understanding of the many public resources and databases being generated by large-scale genomics projects. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing; undergraduates with Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 551: Introduction to Biostatistics for Population Health.

    Fall, 3 cr. Course designed for population health researcher. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary probability, probability distributions, one- and two-sample normal inference (point estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals), power and sample size calculations, one- and two-sample binomial inference, underlying assumptions and disgnostic work. Pre-reqs: College algebra; enrollment in population health sciences MS or PhD program or consent of the instructor. Pre-Reqs: Declared in the Population Health or Epidemiology graduate program. Students may not enroll if they have taken Biostatistics and Medical Informatics/Statistics 511 or Biostatistics and Medical Informatics/Statistics 541.

  • Statistics 541: Introduction to Biostatistics

    Fall, 3 cr. Course designed for the biomedical researcher. Topics include: descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, estimation, confidence intervals, t-test, chi-squared tests, analysis of variance, linear regression, correlation, nonparametric tests, survival analysis and odds ration. Biomedical applications used for each topic. Pre-reqs: Math 221 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Statistics 576: Introduction to Bioinformatics

    Fall, 3 cr. Algorithms for computational problems in molecular biology. The course will study algorithms for problems such as: genome sequencing and mapping, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, modeling sequence classes and features, phylogenetic tree construction, and gene-expression data analysis. Pre-Reqs: Comp Sci 367, Math 222

  • Statistics 776: Advanced Bioinformatics

    Spring, 3 cr. Advanced course covering computational problems in molecular biology. The course will study algorithms for problems such as: modeling sequence classes and features, phylogenetic tree construction, gene-expression data analysis, protein and RNA structure prediction, and whole-genome analysis and comparisons. Pre-Reqs: Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 576.

  • Statistics 877: Statistical Methods for Molecular Biology

    Spring, 3 cr. Develop statistical problems in gene mapping, high throughputomic data analysis, phylogenetics and sequence analysis. Introduce ideas of key methods using published data. Statisticians learn statistical basis for research methodology. Collaboration among students and with biologists is encouraged through projects. Pre-Reqs: Statistics 309-310 or 609-610 or 709-710 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Genetics 466 or equivalent strongly recommended

  • Zoology 604: Computer-based Gene and Disease/Disorder Research Lab

    Spring, 2 cr. In recent years, a large number of open access biological and biomedical databases have become available for on-line, computer-based research. Among these databases are the NCBI, Allen Brain Atlas, NIH DAVID, Genemania, WebQTL, and Broad Institute's GSEA and MSIgDB. Within these sites is a wealth of information regarding genes, gene expression, gene pathways, behavioral characteristics, and disorders or diseases, such as autism, arthritis, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Learning to navigate these resources is a valuable skill to develop for any student interested in a career in science or medicine. Students will be guided through databases and shown how to extract information to develop new ideas. Each student will pick a disease or disorder of interestanding(e.g., autism, arthritis, epilepsy, schizophrenia) and use multiple databases to develop new ideas on which genes may be playing important, but previously underappreciated or unknown roles. Students will be expected to regularly research and review publications via PubMed, Web of Science, or Google Scholar to provide context for their findings and to refine their research. At the end of the semester, the student will produce a primary research article that is based on their research findings and give an oral presentation on their project along with the paper. Pre-Reqs: Introductory Biology or consent of the instructor

Cell Biology / Cell Signaling

  • Biochemistry 630: Cellular Signal Transduction Mechanisms

    Fall, 3 cr. Lecture-discussion. Comprehensive coverage of human hormones, growth factors and other mediators; emphasis on hormone and growth factor action in cytoplasm and nucleus and biosynthesis. Prereqs: Introductory biochemistry (Biochemistry 501 or 507 & 508) and cell biology (Biocore 303 or Zoology 570 or Pathology 750) or consent of the instructor.

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 640: Fundamentals of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

    Spring, 3cr. The course will provide a foundation to understand fundamental biological, mechanistic, and experimental concepts in the field of stem cell and regenerative biology. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with a significant background in one or more of the following fields: biochemistry, molecular biology and cell biology. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 507, Biochemistry 508, Genetics 566 or Zoology 570

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 701: Cell Signaling and Human Disease

    Spring, 1cr. This course is intended for PhD and MSTP students interested in medically relevant basic science. Landmark discoveries, as well as current knowledge and controversies in human health, with an emphasis on cancer biology, will be covered. Pre-reqs: Students must be enrolled in a PhD or MSTP program.

  • Neuroscience 670: Stem Cells and the Central Nervous System

    Spring, 2-3 cr. Among the topics that will be included in the course are: embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and the transplantation of embryonic and adult stem cell to the developing and adult CNS for experimental and therapeutic purposes. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or equiv. Grad students in the sciences or advanced undergraduates with consent of the instructor.

  • Pathology 709: Contemporary Topics in Cell Structure and Function

    Spring, 2 cr. In-depth introduction to current topics in cell biology. Problems and issues confronting cell biologists are explored through reading and discussion of research papers. Topic varies each year. Pre-Reqs: Previous course in cell biology.

  • Physiology 533: Molecular Physiology

    Spring, 2 cr. This course will introduce functional aspects of mammalian organ systems from a molecular perspective. Human diseases will receive a special emphasis, and diseases will be used to illustrate the connection between molecules and biological function. Pre-Reqs: chemistry 103 & 104; Physics 201 & 202 or 207 & 208; Zoology 151 & 152 or Biocore 303 & 304; Math 221 & 222. Recommended but not required: Biocore 323, Biochemistry (e.g. Biochemistry 507 & 508), cell biology (e.g. Zoology 570)

  • Zoology 562: Human Cytogenetics

    Spring, 2 cr. Fundamental principles of cytogenetics and special problems of human cytogenetics for biology and medical students. Pre-Reqs: Genetics/Botany/Zoology 160 or 466 or Medical Genetics 721 or consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 570: Cell Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Comprehensive course on modern aspects of cell biology. Pre-Reqs: One yr college biology, one year chemistry.

Chemistry

  • Chemistry 606: Physical Methods for Structure Determination

    Spring, 1-3 cr. A survey of spectroscopic methods for inorganic structure determination. This course will introduce the major non-crystallographic techniques with an emphasis on the application to structural analysis. The basic theory and methodology of each form of spectroscopy will be presented. Topics covered include: ligand field theory, electronic absorption, IR/Raman, Mossbauer and EPR spectroscopies, and magnetic susceptibility. Pre-reqs: Chem 511 & 562 or cons inst. Chem 608 or equiv recommended.

  • Chemistry 621: Instrumental Analysis

    Fall, 3-4 cr. Chemical instrumentation, spectrochemical, electrochemical and other methods of instrumental analysis; lecture and lab. Pre-Reqs: Credit for or concurrent registration in Chemistry 561 or consent of the instructor.

  • Chemistry 623: Experimental Spectroscopy

    Spring, 2-3 cr. The theory behind current spectroscopic methods employed in chemical analysis with applications in atomic and molecular absorption spectroscopy, infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy, flourescence and light scattering; lecture and laboratory projects. Pre-reqs: Chem 562 or consent of instructor.

  • Chemistry 626: Genomic Science

    Spring, 2 cr. This course is designed to bring cutting-edge topics in the genomic sciences into the reach of traditionally "pure" chemistry, biology, engineering, computer science & statistics students. It is also designed for enabling biologically-oriented students to deal with the advances in analytical science so that they may incorporate new genomic science concepts into their own scientific repertoires. Intended for graduate students and for undergraduates with extensive research experience. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student standing

  • Chemistry 627: Methods and Technologies for Protein Characterization

    Spring, 2-3 cr. This course seeks to engage students interested in chemical instrumentation and those who desire to apply proteomic technologies to current biological problems. Understanding the current proteomics landscape, the limitations of these technologies, and their practical applications are among the course learning objectives. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student standing.

  • Chemistry 630: Proteomic Approaches for Biologists

    Fall, 2 cr. Proteomics and metabolomics are playing an increasingly important role in biology and medicine. Many biology labs are now starting to use proteomics and metabolomics in their research projects. This course is designed specifically for students in biological sciences who have interests to learn proteomics and metabolomics. It will integrate formal classroom lectures with one-on-one consultation. Lectures include the essential fundamentals and applications in mass spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics to address biological/medical problems. Meanwhile, one-on-one consultation will be offered to respond to students' individual needs, including the design of proteomics/metabolomics experiments, troubleshooting, and proper interpretation of the results. Students who take this course should have basic chemistry and biochemistry knowledge. Pre-req.: Graduate student standing or Biochemistry 501 or Biochemistry 507.

  • Chemistry 636: Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Introduction to NMR

    Spring, 2 cr. This course will instruct students on the theory and practice of NMR spectroscopy. It is a full semester course, consisting of 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours laboratory instruction. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited based on avail instrumentation for lab exercises.

  • Chemistry 637: Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Advanced NMR

    Summer, 1-2 cr. This course will instruct students on advanced methods of NMR spectroscopy. It is offered as a seven week module, consisting of 7 hours of lecture, 14 hours of laboratory instruction, 1 hour final exam. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited based on avail instrumentation for lab exercises.

  • Chemistry 638: Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Introduction to Mass Spectrometry

    Spring, 1 cr. This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of mass spectrometry. It is offered as a 7 week module, consisting of 15 hours of lecture and laboratory instruction. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited based on avail instrumentation for lab exercises.

  • Chemistry 665: Biophysical Chemistry

    Spring, 4 cr. Equilibrium thermodynamics, chemical kinetics and transport properties, with emphasis on solution behavior and application to noncovalent interactions of biological macromolecules in solution. For graduate students interested in the biological applications of physical chemistry. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student or consent of the instructor. Students mustandingmeet prereqs for Chemistry 565 & have some previous background in physical chemistry.

  • Chemistry 668: Biophysical Spectroscopy

    Fall, 2-3 cr. Focuses on the underlying principles and applications of spectroscopic and microscopy methods employed to solve biological problems at the atomic and molecular level. Techniques covered in this class include electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, light scattering, fluorescence microscopy, multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 561 or equivalent. Chemistry 562 or equivalent recommended.

  • Chemistry 704: Chemical Biology

    Fall, 2 cr. Chemistry and biology of proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates; application of organic chemistry to problems in cell biology, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, 1 yr organic chemistry & consent of the instructor.

  • Chemistry 766: Molecular Recognition

    Fall, 2-3 cr. Origin, nature, classification, and description of intermolecular forces. The hydrophobic effect. Molecular complexes, binding constants, and their measurements. General principles of self-assembly, molecular recognition, complex formation, hostandingdesign. Supramolecular systems and their dynamics. Micelles, bilayers, vesicles, biological membranes. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 561 or equivalent, physical chemistry or consent of the instructor.

Developmental Biology

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 610: Fundamentals of Mammalian Embryology

    Spring, 2 cr. To provide graduate and advanced undergraduate students with a thorough grounding in the conceptual basis of mammalian development using the mouse (and sometimes other species) as a model system. Pre-Reqs: Undergraduates: 9 credit hours of introductory courses to Biological Sciences and consent of the instructor; Junior Standing. Graduate Students: Matriculation in any Master’s/Doctoral Program in Biology or Bioengineering, or consent of the instructor

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 650: Molecular and Cellular Organogenesis

    Spring, 3 cr. The course is intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate students interested in developmental biology, stem cell biology, molecular basis of normal organ formation, and biomedical engineering. This course will cover the mostandingcurrent knowledge of the basic principles of organogenesis including the molecular and cellular pathways leading to normal organ development and tissue regeneration. Tissue/organ specification, differentiation, and developmental processes, focusing on molecular and associated signal transduction pathways and transcriptional regulation will be covered in depth. Current understanding of the role of stem cells in normal and abnormal development and regenerative biology is included. Pre-Reqs: Introductory course in developmental biology such as Zoology 470, Mammalian Embryology, or other is recommended but not required.

  • Genetics 627: Animal Developmental Genetics

    Spring, 3 cr. Advanced Genetics course focusing on genetic mechanisms of animal embryonic development, with particular emphasis on central molecular circuitries that control development and genetic analytical tools used to reveal them. Using a combination of lectures and primary research literature reading/student-led seminars, we will address topics including maternal and epigenetic inheritance, the egg-to-embryo transition, pattern formation, organogenesis, coordination of cellular and molecular mechanisms, and animal models of human congenital disorders. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Consent of the Instructor. Zoology 470 is recommended.

  • Zoology 470: Introduction to Animal Development

    Spring, 3 cr. This course introduces students to the major features and mechanisms of early embryonic development in animals, including (1) the major stages of early development, (2) how form arises in the embryo (morphogenesis), (3) how differences arise between cells in the embryo, and (4) how specific genes control these processes. Pre-Reqs: Zoology 101 or Zoology 151/152.

  • Zoology 555: Laboratory in Developmental Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Developmental anatomy and laboratory manipulations of representative animal embryos used extensively for analysis of developmental phenomena (sea urchins, amphibia, annelids, molluscs, ascidians, insects, chicks, fish, mice).
    Pre-Reqs: Previous credit, or concurrent registration, in either Zoology 440, 470, 625, or Biocore 333, or consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 765: Developmental Neuroscience

    Spring, 3 cr. Analysis of neural development with emphasis on experimental approaches. Combination of lectures and discussions of primary literature. Topics include neural induction, patterning, mechanisms of axon guidance, neural crestandingcell migration and differentiation, cortical development, and synapse formation and elimination. Pre-Reqs: Grad standing in biological sciences; undergraduates with consent of the instructor.

Endocrinology

  • Biochemistry 630: Cellular Signal Transduction Mechanisms (Also Phmacol-m/ Zoology 630)

    Fall, 3 cr. Lecture-discussion. Comprehensive coverage of human hormones, growth factors and other mediators; emphasis on hormone and growth factor action in cytoplasm and nucleus and biosynthesis. Prereqs: Introductory biochemistry (Biochemistry 501 or 507 & 508) and cell biology (Biocore 303 or Zoology 570 or Pathology 750) or consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 603: Endocrinology

    Fall, 3-4 cr. An introduction to the role that hormones play in a variety of physiological pocesses and behaviors from a molecular to a systems level. Topics include hormonal involvement in growth, development, homeostasis, reproduction, and behavior, with an emphasis on vertebrate systems. Pre-Reqs: Background in biochemistry & cell and molecular biology recommended, but not required.

Exercise

  • Kinesiology 774: Metabolic Responses to Exercise and Environmental Stress

    Spring, 2 cr. Examination of the metabolic and biochemical responses to acute and chronic exercise and environmental stress. Emphasis placed on the mechanisms underlying these responses. Pre-Reqs: Physiol 720 or consent of the instructor.

  • Kinesiology 779: Human Muscle Function in Health and Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Multidisciplinary seminar on human muscle function in health and disease. The course is geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students in kinesiology, physical and occupational therapy, motor control and behavior, neurophysiology resident in neurology and other related allied health professionals. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor.

Genetics

  • Genetics 472: Molecular Evolution

    Spring, 3 cr. Basic principles of molecular evolution. Lecture topics include population genetics, molecular phylogenetics, rates and patterns of evolution, genome evolution, and molecular ecology. While emphasis will be on insect model systems, examples from other groups of organisms also will be presented. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Biocore sequence, or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 466: General Genetics

    Fall or Spring, 3 cr. Genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Includes Mendelian genetics, mapping, molecular genetics, genetic engineering, cytogenetics, quantitative genetics, and population genetics. Illustrative material includes viruses, bacteria, plants, fungi, insects, and humans. Lectures and discussion. Pre-Reqs: (Biology/Botany/Zoology 151 or Biocore 381 or Biology/Botany 130 or Biology/Zoology 101 and 102) and (Chemistry 104).

  • Genetics 472: Molecular Evolution

    Spring, 3 cr. Basic principles of molecular evolution. Lecture topics include population genetics, molecular phylogenetics, rates and patterns of evolution, genome evolution, and molecular ecology. While emphasis will be on insect model systems, examples from other groups of organisms also will be presented. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Biocore sequence, or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 565: Human Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Principles, problems, and methods of human genetics. Surveys aspects of medical genetics, biochemical genetics, molecular genetics, cytogenetics, quantitative genetics, and variation as applied to humans. P: Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 607 Advanced Microbial Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Molecular genetic methods and related aspects of prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic biology, as well as critical analysis of the scientific literature. Approximately two-thirds of the course will focus on prokaryotes and one-third on lower eukaryotic microbes. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent, Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, & Graduate student or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 626: Genomic Science

    Spring, 2 cr. This course is designed to bring cutting-edge topics in the genomic sciences into the reach of traditionally "pure" chemistry, biology, engineering, computer science & statistics students. It is also designed for enabling biologically-oriented students to deal with the advances in analytical science so that they may incorporate new genomic science concepts into their own scientific repertoires. Intended for graduate students and for undergraduates with extensive research experience. Pre-req: Graduate student standing or instructor consent

  • Genetics 627: Animal Developmental Genetics

    Spring, 3 cr. Advanced Genetics course focusing on genetic mechanisms of animal embryonic development, with particular emphasis on central molecular circuitries that control development and genetic analytical tools used to reveal them. Using a combination of lectures and primary research literature reading/student-led seminars, we will address topics including maternal and epigenetic inheritance, the egg-to-embryo transition, pattern formation, organogenesis, coordination of cellular and molecular mechanisms, and animal models of human congenital disorders. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or consent of the instructor. Zoology 470 is recommended.

  • Genetics 629: Evolutionary Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Basic principles of phylogenetics, population genetics and quantitative genetics including the construction of gene trees, forces affecting the amount and distribution of genetic variation in populations, and the inheritance and evolution of multifactorial characters. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Biocore 301 & 302 or equiv. Knowledge of introductory calculus & statistics or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 631: Plant Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Basic concepts of genetics and genomics as applied to plants, including discussions on breeding systems (modes of reproduction, sex determination, self incompatibility and crossing barriers), linkage analysis, genome structure and function (structure, function and evolution of nuclear and organellar chromosomes; haploidy and polyploidy; expression regulation and epigenetics), and a description of current methodologies used in the analysis of these processes. This course is based on lectures and in-class discussions of assigned readings. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent.

  • Genetics 633: Population Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. A course for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students focused on the interpretation of genetic variation in natural populations. We will study the basic models that connect genetic variation to underlying evolutionary and genetic processes, including mutation, recombination, genetic drift, migration, and natural selection. We will discuss methods for measuring DNA variation, including the analysis of genome-scale data sets. Pre-reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 708: Methods and Logic in Genetic Analysis

    Spring, 3 cr. Contemporary issues in genetic, developmental, cell, and molecular biology are addressed in a discussion format. Invited speakers give researech lectures and reading material is taken from the primary literature. The discussion focuses on evaluating genetic approaches to biological problems. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing, Genetics 701 or equivalent.

  • Microbiology 607: Advanced Microbial Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Molecular genetic methods and related aspects of prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic biology, as well as critical analysis of the scientific literature. Approximately two-thirds of the course will focus on prokaryotes and one-third on lower eukaryotic microbes. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent, Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, & Graduate student or consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 904: Analytical Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

    Fall, 2 cr. In-depth focus on current areas of epidemiologic investigation. Each semester one or more modules (e.g., cardiovascular, cancer, infectious diseases, women's health, international, etc.) will be offered. Pre-reqs: Varies by section.

Laboratory / Methods Courses

  • Anatomy 625: Brain Cell Cultures and Imaging: A Lab Class

    Fall, 4 cr. Hands-on laboratory training in neuronal cell culture, live and fixed neuron labeling and microscopy techniques to visualize neurons in culture, as well as image analysis methods. Pre-reqs: Intro courses in biochem, cell biology & anatomy. Enrollment limited to 12 students, authorized by consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 660: Methods in Biochemistry

    Fall, 2 cr. Survey of modern techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry. Pre-Reqs: 2 semester organic chemistry, intermediate or advanced biochemistry/molecular biology, & consent of the instructor.

  • Biomolecular Chemistry 606: Mathematical Methods for Structural Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological structures. Mathematical techniques include ordinary and partial differential equations, 3D Fourier analysis and optimization. Biological applications include protein folding, molecular dynamics, implicit solvent electrostatics, and molecular interactions. Pre-Reqs: Math 340 or 341; Computer Sciences 302, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biomolecular Chemistry 609: Mathematical Methods for Systems Biology

    Spring, 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological systems. Mathematical techniques include dynamical systems and differential equations. Applications to biological pathways, including understanding of bistability within chemical reaction systems, are emphasized. Pre-Reqs: Math 340 or 341; Math 415, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 576: Introduction to Bioinformatics

    Fall, 3 cr. Algorithms for computational problems in molecular biology. The course will study algorithms for problems such as: genome sequencing and mapping, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, modeling sequence classes and features, phylogenetic tree construction, and gene-expression data analysis. Pre-Reqs: Computer Science 367, Math 222

  • Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 776: Advanced Bioinformatics

    Spring, 3 cr. Advanced course covering computational problems in molecular biology. The course will study algorithms for problems such as: modeling sequence classes and features, phylogenetic tree construction, gene-expression data analysis, protein and RNA structure prediction, and whole-genome analysis and comparisons. Pre-Reqs: BMI 576.

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 803: Molecular Technologies I

    Fall, 2 cr. An intensive workshop that will teach biotechniques, biotechnology product development, and biotechnology applications interfaced with analytical, communication and teaching skills. This workshop will simulate the corporate and academic biotechnology setting. Pre-Reqs: Admission into the M.S. biotechnology program.

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 834: Molecular Technologies III

    Fall, 1 cr. Covers theory and applications of drug discovery. Laboratory assays and methods focus on primary, secondary, and ADMETox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) drug screening. In addition, students build communication skills while working on team projects and reporting scientific results. Pre-Reqs: Admission to M.S. in biotechnology

  • Chemical and Biological Engineering 361: Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory

    Spring, 3 cr. Instruction and laboratory experiments in basic molecular biology techniques, recombinant protein production, fermentation processes, protein purification and characterization, and related bioengineering laboratory topics. Geared towards chemical engineering students with interests in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Pre-Reqs: CBE 250; Zoo 151 or 153 or equivalent; or consent of the instructor.

  • Chemistry 621: Instrumental Analysis

    Fall, 3-4 cr. Chemical instrumentation, spectrochemical, electrochemical and other methods of instrumental analysis; lecture and lab. Pre-Reqs: Credit for or concurrent registration in Chemistry 561 or consent of the instructor.

  • Chemistry 623: Experimental Spectroscopy

    Spring, 2-3 cr. The theory behind current spectroscopic methods employed in chemical analysis with applications in atomic and molecular absorption spectroscopy, infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy, flourescence and light scattering; lecture and laboratory projects. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 562 or consent of the instructor.

  • Chemistry 627: Methods and Technologies for Protein Characterization

    Spring, 2-3 cr. This course seeks to engage students interested in chemical instrumentation and those who desire to apply proteomic technologies to current biological problems. Understanding the current proteomics landscape, the limitations of these technologies, and their practical applications are among the course learning objectives. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student standing.

  • Chemistry 636: Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Introduction to NMR

    Spring, 2 cr. This course will instruct students on the theory and practice of NMR spectroscopy. It is a full semester course, consisting of 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours laboratory instruction. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited based on availability of instrumentation for lab exercises.

  • Chemistry 637: Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Advanced NMR

    Summer, 1-2 cr. This course will instruct students on advanced methods of NMR spectroscopy. It is offered as a seven week module, consisting of 7 hours of lecture, 14 hours of laboratory instruction, 1 hour final exam. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited based on availability of instrumentation for lab exercises.

  • Chemistry 638 Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Introduction to Mass Spectrometry

    Spring, 1 cr. This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of mass spectrometry. It is offered as a 7 week module, consisting of 15 hours of lecture and laboratory instruction. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited based on availability of instrumentation for lab exercises

  • Chemistry 668: Biophysical Spectroscopy

    Fall, 2-3 cr. Focuses on the underlying principles and applications of spectroscopic and microscopy methods employed to solve biological problems at the atomic and molecular level. Techniques covered in this class include electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, light scattering, fluorescence microscopy, multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 561 or equivalent. Chemistry 562 or equivalent recommended.

  • Genetics 545: Genetics Laboratory

    Spring, 2 cr. Students gain practical experience in classical and molecular genetic laboratory techniques using plants, animals, and fungi. Topics include complementation and linkage analysis, gene mapping, library screening, yeastandingand bacterial transformation, restriction analysis, PCR, sequencing, and Southern blot analysis. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent.

  • Genetics 708: Methods and Logic in Genetic Analysis

    Spring, 3 cr. Contemporary issues in genetic, developmental, cell, and molecular biology are addressed in a discussion format. Invited speakers give researech lectures and reading material is taken from the primary literature. The discussion focuses on evaluating genetic approaches to biological problems. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing, Genetics 701 or equivalent.

  • Horticulture 339: Plant biotechnology: Principles and Techniques I

    Fall, 4 cr. Theoretical and practical training in plant biotechnology including molecular biology, protein biochemistry and basic bioinformatic techniques used in fundamental and applied research on plants. Valuable hands-on training to those interested in careers in biotechnology. Pre-Reqs: Botany/Zoology 152 or equivalent & Chemistry 104 or equivalent.

  • Horticulture 500: Molecular Biology Techniques

    Spring, 3 cr. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with recombinant DNA technology. This will be accomplished through lectures as well as hands on exposure to methodologies used in molecular biology laboratories. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or 621 or Genetics 466 or Bacteriology 303, 304 or consent of the instructor.

  • Microbiology 632: Industrial Microbiology / Biotechnology

    Spring, 2 cr. Application of modern techniques of genetics and physiology to the large-scale production of microbial products; industrial strain improvement; scale-up of microbial processes; survey of industrial processes using microorganisms. Pre-Reqs: Bacteriology 526 & Biochemistry 501 or equivalent.

  • Neuroscience 555: Lab Course in Developmental Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Developmental anatomy and laboratory manipulations of representative animal embryos used extensively for analysis of developmental phenomena (sea urchins, amphibia, annelids, molluscs, ascidians, insects, chicks, fish, mice). Pre-Reqs: Previous or concurrent registration in either Zoology 440, 470, 625, or Biocore 333, or consent of the instructor

  • Neuroscience 616: Lab Course in Neurobiology and Behavior

    Spring, 4 cr. Students will do three independent experimental modules exploring neurophysiology and behavior, each taking 4-5 weeks. Students will work in groups of 2 or 3 and will learn techniques and then develop their own short investigations into each of three separate areas of neurobiology. There will be continual interaction between students and faculty. Pre-Reqs: Zoology 523 and Zoology 524 or Physiol 610 and Anatomy 611

  • Neuroscience 625: Brain Cell Cultures and Imaging: A Lab Course

    Fall, 4 cr. Hands-on laboratory training in neuronal cell culture, live and fixed neuron labeling and microscopy techniques to visualize neurons in culture, as well as image analysis methods. Pre-Reqs: Intro courses in biochemistry, cell biology & anatomy. Enrollment limited to 12 students, authorized by consent of the instructor.

  • Neuroscience 675: Methods for Neuroimaging Research

    Spring, 3 cr.

  • Psychology 455: Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience

    Spring, 1 cr. Int roduction to research techniques and experimental methods of physiological psychology. Emphasis on the surgical, histological and electrophysiological techniques for studying the neural mechanisms of behavior. Pre-Reqs: Psychology 201 or 202 or 281; Zoology 101/102 or Zoology/Botany 151/152 or Biocore 301; Concurrent registration in Psych 454

  • Zoology 555: Laboratory in Developmental Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Developmental anatomy and laboratory manipulations of representative animal embryos used extensively for analysis of developmental phenomena (sea urchins, amphibia, annelids, molluscs, ascidians, insects, chicks, fish, mice).
    Pre-Reqs: Previous credit, or concurrent registration, in either Zoology 440, 470, 625, or Biocore 333, or consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 604 Computer-based Gene and Disease/Disorder Research Lab

    Spring, 2 cr. In recent years, a large number of open access biological and biomedical databases have become available for on-line, computer-based research. Among these databases are the NCBI, Allen Brain Atlas, NIH DAVID, Genemania, WebQTL, and Broad Institute's GSEA and MSIgDB. Within these sites is a wealth of information regarding genes, gene expression, gene pathways, behavioral characteristics, and disorders or diseases, such as autism, arthritis, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Learning to navigate these resources is a valuable skill to develop for any student interested in a career in science or medicine. Students will be guided through databases and shown how to extract information to develop new ideas. Each student will pick a disease or disorder of interestanding(e.g., autism, arthritis, epilepsy, schizophrenia) and use multiple databases to develop new ideas on which genes may be playing important, but previously underappreciated or unknown roles. Students will be expected to regularly research and review publications via PubMed, Web of Science, or Google Scholar to provide context for their findings and to refine their research. At the end of the semester, the student will produce a primary research article that is based on their research findings and give an oral presentation on their project along with the paper. Pre-Reqs: Introductory Biology or consent of the instructor

Metabolism

  • Biochemistry 375: Molecular Control of Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Spring, 3 Cr.

  • Biochemistry 550: Topics in Medical Biochemistry

    Spring, 2 cr. Biochemical and molecular analysis of selected human diseases. Topics will include lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, cell cycle regulation and oncogene function in cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) structure, life cycle, and mechanism of acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome (AIDS). Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501, 507, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biological Systems Engineering 349: Quantitative Techniques for Biological Systems.

    Spring, 3 cr. Principles s of how energy and materials are utilized in Cells, organisms and ecosystems. Mass transfer, heat and energy balances applied to cell metabolism, plants, and ecosystems. Quantification of biological processes to allow manipulation for human benefit. Pre-Reqs: Math 222, Chem 104 or Chem 109, introductory biology course, 1 yr of high school physics, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biomedical Engineering 782: Modeling Biological Systems

    Spring, 3 cr. Literature survey of mathematical models in biology at the molecular and cellular levels; application of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics to biological systems; comparison of deterministic and stochastic strategies. Pre-Reqs: Math 319 or 320 or consent of the instructor.

  • Comparative Biosciences 502: Molecular and Metabolic Basis of Medicine

    Spring, 3 cr. This course covers metabolism with a more advanced incorporation of concepts of chemistry, cell biology and physiology. Clinical correlations in veterinary medicine are also covered. Pre-Reqs: Veterinary Medicine student and Biochemistry 501 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor.

  • Kinesiology 774: Metabolic Responses to Exercise and Environmental Stress

    Spring, 2 cr. Examination of the metabolic and biochemical responses to acute and chronic exercise and environmental stress. Emphasis placed on the mechanisms underlying these responses. Pre-Reqs: Physiol 720 or consent of the instructor.

  • Medical Microbiology and Immunology 677: Molecular Medicine

    Spring, 1-3 cr. Lectures on a specialized topic of current interestandingin medical microbiology. Course content will vary with instructor. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional Sciences 510: Biochemical Principles of Human and Animal Nutrition.

    Fall, Spring, 3 cr. Lectures in nutrition for students with a substantial background in biochemistry. Emphasis on biochemical and physiological fundamentals of nutrition. Discussion of protein, fat, carbohydrate, energy, minerals and vitamins and their roles and interrelationships in nutrition and metabolism. Pre-Reqs: Biomolecular Chemistry 314 or 503, Biochemistry 501 or 507, or consent of the instructor

  • Nutritional Science 619: Advanced Nutrition: Intermediary Metabolism Of Macronutrients

    Spring, 3 cr. Discuss metabolic control; gastrointestinal physiology; nutrient absorption; molecular, cellular, organismal aspects of glucose transport, metabolism, regulation; fuel sensing; molecular regulation of fatty acid, lipid metabolism; cellular, organismal aspects of protein metabolism; hormonal control of metabolism; experimental approaches for studying metabolism. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student; Nutritional Sciences 510 or Biochemistry 507 & 508 or Biomolecular chemistry 503 (or concurrent registration) or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional Sciences 623: Advanced Nutrition: Minerals

    Fall, 1 cr. Topics discussed in regard to minerals are: metabolic roles; absorption, excretion, transport and cellular metabolism; nutritional and toxicological standards for humans and animal models; bioavailability; genetic interactions; and research methodologies. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing; Nutritional Sciences 510 & Physiology 335 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional Sciences 631: Clinical Nutrition

    Fall, 4 cr. Body systems in relation to the alterations in nutrition and metabolism that accompany disease states. Research related to therapeutic nutrition. Pre-Reqs: Nutr Sci 332, 431; Biochemistry 501 or BmolChem 314; ADI classification or consent of the instructor

  • Pathology 402: Pathophysiological Principles of Human Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Primarily for students of therapeutic sciences to provide a basic understanding of the causes, pathophysiology, pathology and clinical manifestations of disease states. Pre-Reqs: Physiol 335

  • Pathology 709:Contemporary Topics in Cell Structure and Function

    Spring, 2 cr. In-depth introduction to current topics in cell biology. Problems and issues confronting cell biologists are explored through reading and discussion of research papers. Topic varies each year. Pre-Reqs: Previous course in cell biology

  • Pathology 750: Cellular and Molecular Biology/Pathology

    Spring, 2-3 cr. The emphasis is on our current understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms. Wherever possible, human diseases are used to illustrate the outcome at the organismal level of defects in these mechanisms. Lectures will draw from the current research literature and cover topics such as cell and tissue organization, intracellular sorting, cell migration and growth. Students in Cellular and Molecular Pathology graduate program mustandingenroll for lectures, 2 credits and discussion section, 1 credit. All other students should enroll for lecture only, 2 credits. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. Concurrent registration in Path 709 recommended.

  • Pathology 751: Cell and Molecular Biology of Aging

    Fall, 3 cr. Cellular and molecular pathophysiology of human disease typically afflicting the aged, such as Alzheimer's, osteoporosis, Type II diabetes and arthritis, experimental systems to study aging. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent.

  • Pathology 803: Pathogenesis of Major Human Diseases

    Fall, 3 cr. This course will focus on disease pathogenesis and discussion of the leading disease research model. Throughout the course, we will combine expert clinicians, basic scientists, and literature review on specific major diseases. Pre-Reqs: Upper-level general cell biology course or Pathology 703.

  • Pathology 809: Molecular Basis of Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Focuses on molecular mechanisms of diseases. Course will focus on four modules: Neuroscience, cancer biology, growth factor/matrix biology, and immunology. Course will consist of a one hour lecture and a one hour group discussion. Pre-Reqs: Pathology 750 & 803.

  • Pharmaceutical Sciences 768: Pharmacokinetics

    Fall, 3 cr. Quantitative aspects of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. Philosophy and applications of pharmacokinetic modeling and its use in clinical practice. Pre-Reqs: Consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 801: Epidemiology of Infectious Disease

    Spring, 3 cr. Introduces basic methods to studying the epidemiology of infectious diseases and reviews infectious diseases of major public health importance. Covers the basics of microbiology, immunology, and laboratory-based methods and the principles of disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, mathematical models of disease transmission, and prevention strategies. The etiology, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of ancient, modern, and emerging infectious diseases will be examined. Pre-Reqs: Population Health 797; or consent of the instructor.

  • Soil Science 523: Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry

    Spring, 3 cr. Transformations of nutrients and contaminants in soils and groundwater by microorganisms: emphasis on enzymatic mechanisms and metabolic pathways. Approaches for analyzing microbial populations and activities including molecular techniques. Applications of microbial activities for bioremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 104; Bacteriology 303 or Botany 375 or Biochemistry 501, or consent of the instructor.

Microscopy/Imaging

  • Biomedical Engineering 619: Microscopy of Life

    Fall, 3 cr. Biological Imaging is a vastandingfield ranging from single molecule imaging, electron microscopy, live cell imaging and fluorescence approaches to medical and diagnostic imaging techniques. Many of the fundamental aspects of biological microscopy and biological and biomedical imaging in general will be discussed. Students will be exposed to biological imaging research from across the UW and in lab tours take part in imaging and computational demonstrations. It is the goal that at the end of this "Microscopy of Life" course, given a real-research imaging or micro-analytical problem in biology or medicine, a successful student will be able to identify which technique is bestandingsuited to answer a variety of biological or physiological questions. The course is designed to be a lead-in for more advanced imaging subject matter courses at the UW such as “BME 601-Special Topics in Biological Microscopy”, “Med Phys 530-Medical Imaging Systems” and “Med Phys 471-Multimodality Molecular Imaging in Living Subjects”. Pre-Reqs: 2nd semester introductory physics including light & optics (e.g. 104, 202, 208) or consent of the instructor.

Molecular Biology

  • Biomedical Engineering 782: Modeling Biological Systems

    Spring, 3 cr. Literature survey of mathematical models in biology at the molecular and cellular levels; application of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics to biological systems; comparison of deterministic and stochastic strategies. Pre-Reqs: Math 319 or 320 or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 703: Topics in Eukaryotic Regulation

    Spring, 2 cr. Design and interpretation of experiments addressing molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic regulation. For firstandingyear graduate students with firm knowledge of basic biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 612 and consent of the instructor.

  • Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 576: Introduction to Bioinformatics

    Fall, 3 cr. Algorithms for computational problems in molecular biology. The course will study algorithms for problems such as: genome sequencing and mapping, pairwise and multiple sequence alignment, modeling sequence classes and features, phylogenetic tree construction, and gene-expression data analysis. Pre-Reqs: Computer Science 367, Math 222

  • Botany 505: Plant-Microbe Interactions – Molecular and Ecological Aspects

    Spring, 3 cr. Molecular and ecological aspects of the interactions between plants and microorganisms. This course explores many of the themes, from genetic to integrative, of modern biology, and illustrates how study of plant-microbe interactions contributes to understanding of fundamental plant science. Pre-Reqs: An upper level course in microbiology (e.g. Bacteriology 303); biochemistry (e.g. Biochemistry 501); & genetics (e.g. Genetics 466) or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 575: Biology of Viruses

    Spring, 2 cr. Lecture-discussion. Broad coverage of animal virology taught at molecular level. Topics include virus structure, viral replication/lifecycle, aspects of pathogenesis and prevention. Pre-Reqs: Biocore 301/302, and Zoology 151 or 152; or Medical Microbiology & Immunology 301.

  • Biochemistry / Microbiology 612: Prokaryotic Molecular Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Molecular basis of bacterial physiology and genetics with emphasis on molecular mechanisms; topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, transcription, translation, replication, recombination, regulation of gene expression. Pre-Reqs: Bact 370 or equivalent & Biochemistry 501 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Biochemistry 620 Eukaryotic Molecular Biology (also Cell and Regenerative Biology 620)

    Spring, 2 cr. This course focuses on the basic molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA, RNA, and protein metabolism in eukaryotic organisms. The course is intended for advanced undergraduates and firstandingyear graduate students with a firm knowledge of basic biochemistry. Prereqs: Biochemistry 508 or equivalent.

  • Biomolecular Chemistry 606: Mathematical Methods for Structural Biology

    Fall, 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological structures. Mathematical techniques include ordinary and partial differential equations, 3D Fourier analysis and optimization. Biological applications include protein folding, molecular dynamics, implicit solvent electrostatics, and molecular interactions. Pre-Reqs: Math 340 or 341; Computer Sciences 302, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biomolecular Chemistry 609: Mathematical Methods for Systems Biology

    Spring, 3 cr. Intended to provide a rigorous foundation for mathematical modeling of biological systems. Mathematical techniques include dynamical systems and differential equations. Applications to biological pathways, including understanding of bistability within chemical reaction systems, are emphasized. Pre-Reqs: Math 340 or 341; Math 415, or consent of the instructor.

  • Biomolecular Chemistry 720: Experimental Design and Paradigms in Cellular Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Spring, 3 cr. A literature-based course taught in module format and covering the following areas from historical to modern contexts: biochemistry of post-translational modification of proteins, model organisms, transcriptional switches, chromosome replication, and RNA in biological regulation.

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 650: Molecular and Cellular Organogenesis

    Spring, 3 cr. The course is intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate students interested in developmental biology, stem cell biology, molecular basis of normal organ formation, and biomedical engineering. This course will cover the mostandingcurrent knowledge of the basic principles of organogenesis including the molecular and cellular pathways leading to normal organ development and tissue regeneration. Tissue/organ specification, differentiation, and developmental processes, focusing on molecular and associated signal transduction pathways and transcriptional regulation will be covered in depth. Current understanding of the role of stem cells in normal and abnormal development and regenerative biology is included. Pre-Reqs: Introductory course in developmental biology such as Zoology 470, Mammalian Embryology, or other is recommended but not required.

  • Chemical and Biological Engineering 781: Biological Engineering: Molecules, Cells and Systems

    Fall, 3 cr. Protein engineering and protein-protein interactions, receptor-ligand binding, cell metabolism and signaling, metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, tissue engineering. Additional topics may be covered such as: regenerative medicine, biomaterials, microbe-hostandinginteractions. Pre-Reqs: None

  • Genetics 660: Evolutionary Genomics

    Spring, 2 cr. We will present and discuss modern topics in evolutionary genomics, including genomic approaches, their application to evolutionary biology, and insights gleaned from such studies. Topics include evolution of genome architecture, gene content, and sequences. The course also covers molecular evolution as applied to the genome scale. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Biocore 301/302 sequence or equivalent, and consent of the instructor.

  • Horticulture 500: Molecular Biology Techniques

    Spring, 3 cr. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with recombinant DNA technology. This will be accomplished through lectures as well as hands on exposure to methodologies used in molecular biology laboratories. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or 621 or Genetics 466 or Bact 303, 304 or consent of the instructor.

  • Horticulture 550: Molecular Approaches for Potential Crop Improvement’

    Spring, 3 cr. Introduction of basic concepts of plant molecular biology and molecular techniques in current use. Topics include: organization and regulation of plant genes, gene cloning and analysis, transformation systems for plants, and molecular techniques for crop improvement. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 and Genetics 466 or equivalent courses.

  • Medical Microbiology and Immunology 410: Medical Mycology

    Spring, 2 cr. Lectures and discussions. Pathogenesis, molecular biology, host-parasite interactions, immunology, epidemiology, and diagnosis of systemic, subcutaneous, and superficial fungal infections. Pre-Reqs: 2 semesters of introductory biology w/lab or Biocore series 301-304; a course in immunology or consent of the instructor.

  • Medical Microbiology and Immunology 677: Molecular Medicine

    Spring, 1-3 cr. Lectures on a specialized topic of current interestanding in medical microbiology. Course content will vary with instructor. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

  • Microbiology 668: Microbiology at Atomic Resolution.

    Spring, 3 cr. Three-dimensional protein structures form the basis for discussions of high resolution microbiology; how particular problems are solved with given protein architectures and chemistries and how themes of protein structure are modified and recycled. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry (e.g. Biochemistry 501), molecular biol (e.g. Bact 526 or 612) required, one semester of physical chem preferred

  • Microbiology 726: Regulation of Gene Expression in Prokaryotes

    Spring, 3 cr. An intensive examination of a limited number of systems to illustrate the range of molecular mechanism utilized to control gene expression in bacteria. Pre-reqs: Biochemistry 612 or consent of the instructor.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 610: Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

    Fall, 4 cr. Study of original papers leading to an understanding of the molecular basis of electrical activity in neurons. Topics include voltage-sensitive currents, molecular biology of neuronal receptorrs, synaptic transmission and sensory transduction. Lectures supplemented with experimental demonstrations and discussion sessions. Pre-Reqs: Zoo 523 or equivalent.

  • Pathology 750: Cellular and Molecular Biology/Pathology

    Spring, 2-3 cr. he emphasis is on our current understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms. Wherever possible, human diseases are used to illustrate the outcome at the organismal level of defects in these mechanisms. Lectures will draw from the current research literature and cover topics such as cell and tissue organization, intracellular sorting, cell migration and growth. Students in Cellular and Molecular Pathology graduate program mustandingenroll for lectures, 2 credits and discussion section, 1 credit. All other students should enroll for lecture only, 2 credits. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. Concurrent registration in Pathology 709 recommended.

  • Pathology 751: Cell and Molecular Biology of Aging

    Fall, 3 cr. Cellular and molecular pathophysiology of human disease typically afflicting the aged, such as Alzheimer's, osteoporosis, Type II diabetes and arthritis, experimental systems to study aging. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or equivalent.

  • Pathology 809: Molecular Basis of Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Focuses on molecular mechanisms of diseases. Course will focus on four modules: Neuroscience, cancer biology, growth factor/matrix biology, and immunology. Course will consistandingof a one hour lecture and a one hour group discussion. Pre-Reqs: Pathology 750 & 803.

  • Statistics 877: Statistical Methods for Molecular Biology

    Spring, 3 cr. Develop statistical problems in gene mapping, high throughputomic data analysis, phylogenetics and sequence analysis. Introduce ideas of key methods using published data. Statisticians learn statistical basis for research methodology. Collaboration among students and with biologists is encouraged through projects. Pre-Reqs: Statistics 309-310 or 609-610 or 709-710 or equivalent or consent of the instructor. Genetics 466 or equivalent strongly recommended.

  • Zoology 400: General Molecular Biology

    Spring, 3 cr. Subject matter, credits and prerequisites vary. Pre-Reqs: Varies

Neuroscience

  • Neuroscience Training Program 523: Neurobiology

    Fall, 3 cr. Basic mechanisms in cellular neurobiology: electrophysiology and chemistry of nerve signals, mechanisms in integration, simple nervous pathways and their behavioral correlates. Pre-reqs. Biocore 323 or Zoology 151/152 or Zoology plus an additional course and a year each of chemistry and physics.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 524: Neurobiology II: An Introduction to the Brain and Behavior

    Spring, 3 cr. An introduction to studies of the human nervous system covering neuroanatomy of the brain, neuronal coding, sensory and motor systems, biological rhythms, arousal, attention, physiological regulation, reward, aversion, learning and memory.Pre-Reqs: Zoology 523, equivalent course in physiology, or consent of the instructor.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 610: Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

    Fall, 4 cr. Study of original papers leading to an understanding of the molecular basis of electrical activity in neurons. Topics include voltage-sensitive currents, molecular biology of neuronal receptors, synaptic transmission and sensory transduction. Lectures supplemented with experimental demonstrations and discussion sessions. Pre-req: Zoology 523 or equivalent.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 611: Systems Neuroscience

    Spring, 4 cr. Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian nervous system. Lectures will cover the neuroanatomy of the major subdivisions of the human brain, the major sensory and motor systems, and higher order functions. Lab/discussion sections will emphasize readings from the primary literature and hands-on dissections. Pre-Reqs: Physiology 610

  • Neuroscience Training Program 619: Biology of Mind

    Fall, 3 cr. Origins and structures of mind, brain, and consciousness. Transitions from early mammalian through primate to hominid intelligence. Genetics and plasticity in brain development. Modern studies of human brain mechanisms and consciousness. Pre-Reqs: Junior standing; college level course in biology or psychology.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 635: Neurobiology of Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Seminar course relating major categories of human neurological and opthalmological diseases to fundamental topics in neurobiology. Pre-reqs: Zoology 523 and 524 or consent of the instructor.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 629: Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Memory

    Fall, 3 cr. will focus on the cell signaling and the resulting structural changes that occur at neuronal synapses during memory formation. The aim is to understand how the synaptic changes underlying memory occur. Pre-Reqs: Course in cellular neuroscience (Neuroscience 523 or equivalent); Biochemistry 501 or equivalent.

  • Neuroscience 675: Topic – Molecular Approaches to Neuroscience

    Spring, 2 cr. Prereqs: variable.

  • Neuroscience Training Program 765: Developmental Neuroscience

    Spring, 3cr. Analysis of neural development with emphasis on experimental approaches. Combination of lectures and discussions of primary literature. Topics include neural induction, patterning, mechanisms of axon guidance, neural crest and in cell migration and differentiation, cortical development, and synapse formation and elimination. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing in biological sciences; undergraduates with consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 523: Neurobiology

    Fall, 3 cr. Basic mechanisms in cellular neurophysiology: electrophysiology and chemistry of nerve signals, mechanisms in integration, simple nervous pathways and their behavioral correlates. Pre-Reqs: Biocore 323 or Zoology 151/152 or Zoology 101 plus an additional zool course & a year each of chemistry & physics.

  • Zoology 524: Neurobiology II: An Introduction to the Brain and Behavior

    Spring, 3 cr. An introduction to studies of the human nervous system covering neuroanatomy of the brain, neuronal coding, sensory and motor systems, biological rhythms, arousal, attention, physiological regulation, reward, aversion, learning and memory. Pre-Reqs: Zoology 523, equivalent course in physiology, or consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 619: Biology of Mind

    Fall, 2 cr. Origins and structures of mind, brain, and consciousness. Transitions from early mammalian through primate to hominid intelligence. Genetics and plasticity in brain development. Modern studies of human brain mechanisms and consciousness. Pre-Reqs: Junior standing; college level elementary course in biology or psychology.

  • Zoology 625: Development of the Nervous System

    Spring, 2 cr. Survey of the principles guiding neuronal development. Course will cover descriptive and experimental analyses of developmental mechanisms underlying the formation of both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. Pre-Reqs: One intermediate level course in biology; background in development & neurobiology recommended.

  • Zoology 635: Neurobiology of Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Seminar course relating major categories of human neurological and opthalmological disease to fundamental topics in neurobiology. Pre-Reqs: Zool/Neurosci 523 & 524 or consent of the instructor.

  • Zoology 765: Developmental Neuroscience

    Spring, 3 cr. Analysis of neural development with emphasis on experimental approaches. Combination of lectures and discussions of primary literature. Topics include neural induction, patterning, mechanisms of axon guidance, neural crestandingcell migration and differentiation, cortical development, and synapse formation and elimination.
    Pre-Reqs: Grad standingin biol sci; undergraduates with consent of the instructor.

Nutrition

  • Nutritional Sciences: 619 Advanced Nutrition: Intermediary Metabolism Of Macronutrients (Also Biochem. 619)

    Spring, 3 cr. Discuss metabolic control; gastrointestinal physiology; nutrient absorption; molecular, cellular, organismal aspects of glucose transport, metabolism, regulation; fuel sensing; molecular regulation of fatty acid, lipid metabolism; cellular, organismal aspects of protein metabolism; hormonal control of metabolism; experimental approaches for studying metabolism. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student; Nutritional Sciences 510 or Biochemistry 507 & 508 or Biomolecular Chemistry 503 (or con reg) or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional 621 Introduction to Nutritional Epidemiology

    Spring, 1 cr. Taught every other year.Techniques used to evaluate relationships of diet to health and disease in human populations; integration of knowledge gained with results of animal and clinical studies toward understanding dietary risk or protective factors for disease. Includes advanced diet assessment and basic epidemiologic approaches. Pre-reqs: Graduate standing; Statistics 301 or equivalent & Nutritional Sciences 332 or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional Sciences 623: Advanced Nutrition: Minerals

    Fall, 1 cr. Taught every other year. Topics discussed in regard to minerals are: metabolic roles; absorption, excretion, transport and cellular metabolism; nutritional and toxicological standards for humans and animal models; bioavailability; genetic interactions; and research methodologies. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing; Nutritional Sciences 510 & Physiology 335 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional Sciences 625: Advanced Nutrition: Obesity

    Spring, 1 cr. Taught every other year. Physiology, biochemistry and genetics of human obesity and diabetes. Critical review of current research on their etiology and treatment. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing; Nutritional Sciences 619 or concurrent registration & Physiology 335 or consent of the instructor.

  • Nutritional Sciences 625: Advanced Nutrition: Vitamins

    Spring, 1 cr. Taught every other year. Metabolic functions, metabolism and nutritional requirements of some of the water-soluble vitamins and all of the fat-soluble vitamins. P: Graduate standing; Nutritional Sciences/Biochemistry 510 & Physiology 335 or equivalent or Concurrent Registration or Consent of the Instructor.

  • Population Health 664: Prevention of Overweight and Obesity

    Fall, 2 cr. This course is intended to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge to develop, implement, and evaluate obesity prevention interventions. This course will emphasize pediatric obesity prevention with a focus on nutrition and physical activity health behaviors and environments. Pre-Reqs: MPH or grad student

Omics

  • Biomolchemular Chemistry 627: Methods And Technologies For Protein Characterization

    Spring, 2-3 cr. This course seeks to engage students interested in chemical instrumentation and those who desire to apply proteomic technologies to current biological problems. Understanding the current proteomics landscape, the limitations of these technologies, and their practical applications are among the course learning objectives. Pre-reqs. Graduate standing.

  • Cell and Regenerative Biology 630: Proteomic Approaches for Biologists

    Fall, 2 cr. Proteomics and metabolomics are playing an increasingly important role in biology and medicine. Many biology labs are now starting to use proteomics and metabolomics in their research projects. This course is designed specifically for students in biological sciences who have interests to learn proteomics and metabolomics. It will integrate formal classroom lectures with one-on-one consultation. Lectures include the essential fundamentals and applications in mass spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics to address biological/medical problems. Meanwhile, one-on-one consultation will be offered to respond to students' individual needs, including the design of proteomics/metabolomics experiments, troubleshooting, and proper interpretation of the results. Students who take this course should have basic chemistry and biochemistry knowledge. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student standing or Biochemistry 501 or Biochemistry 507.

  • Chemistry 626: Genomic Science

    Spring, 2 cr. This course is designed to bring cutting-edge topics in the genomic sciences into the reach of traditionally "pure" chemistry, biology, engineering, computer science & statistics students. It is also designed for enabling biologically-oriented students to deal with the advances in analytical science so that they may incorporate new genomic science concepts into their own scientific repertoires. Intended for graduate students and for undergraduates with extensive research experience. Pre-reqs: Graduate student standing.

  • Genetics 564: Genomics and Proteomic Analysis

    Spring, 3 cr. The basic principles of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics will be taught through readings of the scientific literature, class presentations, group projects and computer lab web-based experiences. Emphasis will be placed upon student participation in the learning process. Some topics covered will be: genomic sequencing, motif discovery, DNA microarray, high-throughput genetics, chemical genetics, mass spectrometry techniques and protein networks. Meets the requirements of CALS Capstone course. Pre-reqs: Genetics 466 and consent of the instructor. Biochemistry 501 and Microbiology 303 are recommended

  • Genetics 626: Genomic Science

    Spring, 2cr This course is designed to bring cutting-edge topics in the genomic sciences into the reach of traditionally "pure" chemistry, biology, engineering, computer science & statistics students. It is also designed for enabling biologically-oriented students to deal with the advances in analytical science so that they may incorporate new genomic science concepts into their own scientific repertoires. Intended for graduate students and for undergraduates with extensive research experience. Pre-req: Graduate student standing or instructor consent

  • Genetics 660: Evolutionary Genomics

    Spring, 2 cr. We will present and discuss modern topics in evolutionary genomics, including genomic approaches, their application to evolutionary biology, and insights gleaned from such studies. Topics include evolution of genome architecture, gene content, and sequences. The course also covers molecular evolution as applied to the genome scale.
    Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or Biocore 301/302 sequence or equivalent, and consent of the instructor

  • Genetics 885: Advanced Genomic and Proteomic Analysis

    Fall, even years, 3 cr. With the availability of genome sequences and high-throughput techniques, organismal physiology can now be examined on a global scale by monitoring the behavior of all genes or proteins in a single experiment. This course will present modern techniques in genomics and proteomics, with particular focus on analyzing the data generated by these techniques. Course material will cover genomic sequencing, comparative sequence analysis, phylogeny construction and phylogenomics, transcription factor motif discovery, DNA microarray analysis, techniques in mass spectrometry, proteomic screening methods, and protein-interaction network analysis. In addition to lecture time, the course consists of a 2-hour per week computer lab where students get hands-on experience analyzing genomic and proteomic datasets. In addition, students conduct a semester-long computational project of their choice that uses multiple computational methods discussed in class. Class enrollment is limited to 20 students due to computer lab space. P: General statistics, intermediate or advanced Genetics, and consent of the instructor.

  • Horticulture 555: Plant Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics

    Fall, 2-3 cr. A survey of the underlying technologies of genomic research with a special emphasis on their applications in plant science. Provides students with a deeper understanding of the many public resources and databases being generated by large-scale genomics projects. Pre-Reqs: Grad st; undergraduates with Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

Physiology

  • Animal Science 373: Animal Physiology

    Spring, 3 cr. Students will develop an understanding of physiological processes that regulate the body, learn the anatomy and function of different physiological systems, describe interactions between organ systems, study regulation of an organ system from the molecular to whole animal level, and identify differences between species in the same systems. Pre-Reqs: Biology/Zoology 101 or Biology/Zoology/Botany 151 and Biology/Zoology/Botany 152.

  • Kinesiology 774: Metabolic Responses to Exercise and Environmental Stress

    Spring, 2 cr. Examination of the metabolic and biochemical responses to acute and chronic exercise and environmental stress. Emphasis placed on the mechanisms underlying these responses. Pre-Reqs: Physiology 720 or consent of the instructor.

  • Kinesiology 779: Human Muscle Function in Health and Disease

    Spring, 2 cr. Multidisciplinary seminar on human muscle function in health and disease. The course is geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students in kinesiology, physical and occupational therapy, motor control and behavior, neurophysiology resident in neurology and other related allied health professionals. Pre-reqs: Consent of the instructor.

  • Physiology 533: Molecular Physiology

    Spring, 2 cr. This course will introduce functional aspects of mammalian organ systems from a molecular perspective. Human diseases will receive a special emphasis, and diseases will be used to illustrate the connection between molecules and biological function. Pre-Reqs: chemistry 103 & 104; Physics 201 & 202 or 207 & 208; Zoology 151 & 152 or Biocore 303 & 304; Math 221 & 222. Recommended but not required: Biocore 323, biochemistry (e.g. Biochemistry 507 & 508), cell biology (e.g. Zoology 570).

  • Zoology 611:Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology

    Spring, 3 cr. Course examines general physiological principles by comparing taxa from diverse evolutionary histories and ecological adaptations. Examples include adaptation to environments differing in salinity, temperature, altitude, pressure, or pollution, and examines how nervous and endocrine systems evolved to support the adaptations. Pre-Reqs: Elementary course in Botany or Zoology.

  • Zoology 612: Comparative Physiology Laboratory

    Spring, 2 cr. Pre-Reqs: Zool 611 or con reg

Plant Biology

  • Biochemistry 621 Plant Biochemistry (Also Botany 621)

    Spring, odd years; 3 cr. Lectures. Biochemistry of photosynthesis, respiration, cell walls, and other metabolic and biosynthetic processes in plants. Prereqs: Biochemistry 501 or 507 or consent of the instructor.

  • Botany 500: Plant Physiology

    Spring, 3-4 cr. An in-depth look at plant growth, development, respiration, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, and water relations. For junior, senior and graduate students; not for those who have taken Biocore. In the laboratory, experimental approaches will be used to demonstrate principles described in lecture. 3-credit option (lecture only) available with consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 631: Plant Genetics

    Fall, 2 cr: Basic concepts of genetics and genomics as applied to plants, including discussions on breeding systems (modes of reproduction, sex determination, self incompatibility and crossing barriers), linkage analysis, genome structure and function (structure, function and evolution of nuclear and organellar chromosomes; haploidy and polyploidy; expression regulation and epigenetics), and a description of current methodologies used in the analysis of these processes. This course is based on lectures and in-class discussions of assigned readings. Pre-Reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent.

  • Genetics 840: Regulatory Mechanisms in Plant Development

    Fall, 3 cr. Molecular mechanisms whereby endogenous and environmental regulatory factors control development; emphasis on stimulus perception and primary events in the signal chain leading to modulated gene expression and cellular development; lecture. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or 601 & Botany 500 or Biocore 301 & 323.

  • Horticulture 500: Molecular Biology Techniques

    Spring , 3 cr. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with recombinant DNA technology. This will be accomplished through lectures as well as hands on exposure to methodologies used in molecular biology laboratories. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or 621 or Genetics 466 or Bacteriology 303, 304 or consent of the instructor.

  • Horticulture 555: Plant Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics

    Fall, 2-3 cr. A survey of the underlying technologies of genomic research with a special emphasis on their applications in plant science. Provides students with a deeper understanding of the many public resources and databases being generated by large-scale genomics projects. Pre-Reqs: Graduate standing; undergraduates with Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the instructor.

  • Genetics 840: Regulatory Mechanisms in Plant Development

    Fall, 3 cr. Molecular mechanisms whereby endogenous and environmental regulatory factors control development; emphasis on stimulus perception and primary events in the signal chain leading to modulated gene expression and cellular development; lecture. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry 501 or 601 & Botany 500 or Biocore 301 & 323.

Population / Public Health

  • Genetics 633: Population Genetics

    Fall, 3 cr. A course for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students focused on the interpretation of genetic variation in natural populations. We will study the basic models that connect genetic variation to underlying evolutionary and genetic processes, including mutation, recombination, genetic drift, migration, and natural selection. We will discuss methods for measuring DNA variation, including the analysis of genome-scale data sets. Pre-reqs: Genetics 466 or equivalent or consent of the Instructor.

  • Population Health 551: Introduction to Biostatistics for Population Health

    Fall, 3 cr. Course designed for the population health researcher. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary probability, probability distributions, one- and two-sample normal inference (point estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals), power and sample size calculations, one- and two-sample binomial inference, underlying assumptions and diagnostic work. Pre-Reqs: College algebra; enrollment in population health MS or PhD program & consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 603: Clinical and Public Health Microbiology

    Spring, 5 cr. Lecture-seminar sessions. Lectures describe microorganisms of clinical and public health significance. Seminar sessions discuss issues and controversies of specimen receiving and processing, bacteremia, serodiagnosis of infectious agents, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, laboratory management, and novel approaches to detect infectious agents. Pre-Reqs: A course in microbiology

  • Population Health 621: Introduction to Nutritional Epidemiology

    Spring, 1 cr (alternate years).Techniques used to evaluate relationships of diet to health and disease in human populations; integration of knowledge gained with results of animal and clinical studies toward understanding dietary risk or protective factors for disease. Includes advanced diet assessment and basic epidemiologic approaches. Pre-reqs: Statistics 301 or equivalent & Nutritional Sciences 332 or consent of instructor.

  • Population Health 650: Public Health Genomics

    Spring, 1 cr (not taught every year). This course provides: 1) an introduction to public health genomics; 2) a background in basic genetics, genetic technology, the human genome project, and post-genome challenges; 3) fundamentals of genetic epidemiology; 4) a background in the use of genetics in medicine and health services, including genetic testing and screening, genetic counseling, and use of genetic information in disease prevention and management; 5) an awareness of the ethical, legal and social implicaitons of genetics; 6) an introduction to policy implications. Pre-reqs: Consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 664: Prevention of Overweight and Obesity

    Fall, 2 cr. This course is intended to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge to develop, implement, and evaluate obesity prevention interventions. This course will emphasize pediatric obesity prevention with a focus on nutrition and physical activity health behaviors and environments. Pre-Reqs: MPH or grad student

  • Population Health 750 Cancer Epidemiology

    Spring, 2-3 cr. This course will cover current knowledge on cancer occurrence and control in human populations. Design and analysis approaches appropriate for cancer epidemiology will also be discussed. Pre-Reqs: Preventative Medicine 797, 798; & Human Oncology 721 or consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 794: Biological Basis of Population Health

    Fall, 2 cr. This course covers the physiology, biology and biochemistry of selected disease processes deemed to be important to students of population health sciences by virtue of their clinical significance including incidence, mortality and morbidity. Pre-Reqs: Population Health Graduate student or MPH student; or consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 795: Principles of Population Health Sciences

    Fall, 1-3 cr. Introduces students to the multiple determinants of health including medical care, socioeconomic status, the physical environment and individual behavior, and their interactions. Also covered will be the definition and measurement of population health, economic concepts in population health, and ethical and managerial issues in population health improvement. Pre-Reqs: Population Health Graduate student; or consent of the instructor

  • Population Health 797: Advanced Epidemiology: Practice of Epidemiology

    Spring, 3 cr. Lectures and discussions on design, implementation and interpretation of epidemiologic studies; emphasis on methodologic problems in the measurement of disease frequency, natural history and risk factors. Pre-Reqs: Graduate student or healthcare professional program student or consent of the instructor.

  • Pop Health 798: Epidemiologic Methods

    Spring, 3 cr. The main emphasis is the design and interpretation of epidemiologic studies. Includes hands-on experience in the evaluation of epidemiologic evidence, the analysis of epidemiologic data, and the discussion of strategies aimed to improve study validity and efficiency. Pre-Reqs: Population Health 797, or consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 801: Epidemiology of Infectious Disease

    Spring, 3 cr. Introduces basic methods to studying the epidemiology of infectious diseases and reviews infectious diseases of major public health importance. Covers the basics of microbiology, immunology, and laboratory-based methods and the principles of disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, mathematical models of disease transmission, and prevention strategies. The etiology, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of ancient, modern, and emerging infectious diseases will be examined. Pre-Reqs: Population Health 797; or consent of the instructor.

  • Population Health 904: Genetic Epidemiology

    Spring, 3 cr. Introduces basic methods to studying the epidemiology of infectious diseases and reviews infectious diseases of major public health importance. Covers the basics of microbiology, immunology, and laboratory-based methods and the principles of disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, mathematical models of disease transmission, and prevention strategies. The etiology, epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of ancient, modern, and emerging infectious diseases will be examined. Pre-reqs: consent of the instructor.

Seminar classes

Statistics

  • Statistics 309: Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics I

    Spring, 3 cr. Probability and combinatorial methods, discrete and continuous, univariate and multivariate distributions, expected values, moments, normal distribution and derived distributions, estimation. Pre-Reqs: Math 234 or concurrent registration. Students may not enroll if they have completed Statistics 311 or Math/Statistics 431

  • Statistics 310: Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics II

    Spring, 3 cr. This course in mathematical statistical inference aims at providing an understanding of likelihood's central role to statistical inference, using the language of mathematical statistics to analyze statistical procedures, and using the computer as a tool for understanding statistics. Specific topics include: samples and populations, estimation, hypothesis testing, and theoretical properties of statistical inference. Pre-Reqs: Math/Statistics 309 or Statistics 311 or Math/Statistics 431 (with Math/Statistics 309 recommended) AND an introductory statistics course (Statistics 224 or Statistics 301 or Statistics 302 or Statistics 324 or Statistics 371 or Econ 310).

  • Statistics 571: Statistical Methods for Bioscience I

    Fall, 4 cr. Descriptive statistics, distributions, one- and two-sample normal inference, power, one-way ANOVA, simple linear regression, categorical data, non-parametric methods; underlying assumptions and diagnostic work. Pre-Reqs: College algebra: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

  • Statistics 572: Statistic Methods for Bioscience II

    Spring, 4 cr. Polynomial regression, multiple regression, two-way ANOVA with and without interaction, split-plot design, subsampling, analysis of covariance, elementary sampling, introduction to bioassay. Pre-Reqs: Statistics 571.

  • Statistics 601: Statistical Methods I

    Fall, 4 cr. Together with Statistics 602, this course is to provide graduate students in statistics and related quantitative fields with a thorough grounding in modern statistical methods. The specific learning outcomes for the course are to understand data collection in context (how/why data were collected, key questions under study); explore data by effective graphical and numerical summaries; understand probability concepts and models as tools for studying random phenomena and for statistical inference; analyze data using appropriate, modern statistical models, methods, and software; understand the statistical concepts underlying methods; develop the ability to interpret results and critically evaluate the methods used; communicate data analysis and key findings in context. This course will assume students have had at leastandingone semester of calculus and one semester of linear algebra. Pre-reqs: Graduate standing.

  • Statistics 602: Statistical Methods II

    Spring, 4 cr. Together with Statistics 601, this course is to provide graduate students in statistics and related quantitative fields with a thorough grounding in modern statistical methods. The specific learning outcomes for the course are to understand data collection in context (how/why data were collected, key questions under study); explore data by effective graphical and numerical summaries; understand probability concepts and models as tools for studying random phenomena and for statistical inference; analyze data using appropriate, modern statistical models, methods, and software; understand the statistical concepts underlying methods; develop the ability to interpret results and critically evaluate the methods used; communicate data analysis and key findings in context. Pre-reqs: Statistics 601.

  • Statistics 803: Experimental Design I

    Fall, 3 cr. Summary of matrix algebra required, theory of estimable functions, incomplete blocks, balanced incomplete block designs, partially balanced incomplete block designs. Pre-Reqs: Statistics 310 or consent of the instructor.

  • Statistics 804 Experimental Design II

    Prereq Statistics 803

  • Statistical 877 Statistical Methods for Molecular Biology

    Spring, 4 cr. Develop statistical problems in gene mapping, high throughputomic data analysis, phylogenetics and sequence analysis. Introduce ideas of key methods using published data. Statisticians learn statistical basis for research methodology. Collaboration among students and with biologists is encouraged through projects. Pre-Reqs: Statistics309-310 or 609-610 or 709-710 or equivalent, or consent of the instructor. Genetics 466 or equivalent strongly recommended

Structural Biology

  • Chemistry 606: Physical Methods for Structure Determination

    Spring, 1-3 cr. A survey of spectroscopic methods for inorganic structure determination. This course will introduce the major non-crystallographic techniques with an emphasis on the application to structural analysis. The basic theory and methodology of each form of spectroscopy will be presented. Topics covered include: ligand field theory, electronic absorption, IR/Raman, Mossbauer and EPR spectroscopies, and magnetic susceptibility. Pre-Reqs: Chem 511 & 562 or consent of the instructor. Chemistry 608 or equivalent recommended.

  • Chemistry 623: Experimental Spectroscopy

    Spring, 2-3 cr. The theory behind current spectroscopic methods employed in chemical analysis with applications in atomic and molecular absorption spectroscopy, infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy, flourescence and light scattering; lecture and laboratory projects. Pre-Reqs: Chemistry 562 or consent of the instructor.

  • Microbiology 668 Microbiology at Atomic Resolution

    Spring, 3 cr. Three-dimensional protein structures form the basis for discussions of high resolution microbiology; how particular problems are solved with given protein architectures and chemistries and how themes of protein structure are modified and recycled. Pre-Reqs: Biochemistry (e.g. Biochemistry 501), molecular biology (e.g. Bacteriology 526 or 612) required, one semester of physical chemistry preferred.

Writing

  • Communicative Sciences and Disorders 900: Seminar on Grant Preparation - Grant Writing Course

    Spring, 3 cr. (not every year) Listed as "Seminar - Speech Science" in timetable. This seminar will focus on issues related to grant preparation and protocol development, with emphasis on challenges faced by new investigators in establishing an initial research program. The primary focus is on NIH funding, but alternative funding options will be explored. NIH funding programs aimed at new investigators will be reviewed, including F31, F32, R03, K series, R01, R21, P01, P30, and P50 awards. An overview will be provided of the structure of the NIH, components of grant applications and administration, scientific review process and revision process. Weekly course assignments and readings will be assigned, relevant to the student's discipline. A completed research grant proposal for an R03/R21 award (or equivalent) is the final class project.

  • Life Sciences Communication 560: Scientific Writing

    Spring, 3 cr. Writing scientific reports such as journal articles, theses, abstracts for a technical audience. Pre-Reqs: Senior or Grad standing in a science discipline, or consent of the instructor.

  • UW-Madison Writing Center

    The Writing Center helps undergraduate and graduate students in all disciplines become more effective, more confident writers. We believe that writing is a powerful tool not only for communicating existing ideas but also for discovering new ones; that learning to write is a life-long process; and that all writers benefit from sharing work in progress with knowledgeable, attentive readers. Our methods—multi-faceted, flexible, and above all, collaborative—reflect our respect for the individual writer, whose talents, voice, and goals are central to all our endeavors.